How to fix a tooth where cavity is close to nerve - without damaging the nerve

Discussion in 'Patient Forum' started by Mizmelzy, Apr 4, 2018.

  1. Mizmelzy

    Mizmelzy

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    I had a filling fall out for the second time and didn't find out till my check-up tis time. They said that to fill it up and fix the further damage it was very close to the nerve. Last time they filled one close to the nerve it damaged my nerve and my tooth was dying. I am wondering if there is a way to fix the tooth without getting close to the nerve. I have seen one video on YouTube by a dentist that has perfected a technique. Unfortunately, he's half a country away.

    Is there a general knowledge on how to do this? I am changing dentists as this one I have not felt good about. And I have had more trouble with them.

    The tooth in question, I don't know number but its on the right of the two big teeth on top.

    Melissa
     
    Mizmelzy, Apr 4, 2018
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  2. Mizmelzy

    MattKW Verified Dentist

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    Why is it their fault that they fixed one close to the nerve? The decay "close to the nerve" is your fault, they're just trying to fix it. Take some responsibility for your own actions, and appreciate what they're trying to do for you. I would much rather fix a tooth than drill through mushy, smelly decay down to a nerve, and then be faced with an RCT or extraction. Maybe it's not always the dentists that are causing your "trouble".
     
    MattKW, Apr 4, 2018
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  3. Mizmelzy

    Busybee

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    Search for a "minimally invasive" or "conservative" dentist. They will do their best to avoid further trauma to the tooth.
     
    Busybee, Apr 4, 2018
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  4. Mizmelzy

    Mizmelzy

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    First of all, the filling that fell apart first fell apart 2 weeks after it was initially done. Now it's been a year and sometime within the last 6 months (I get regular checkups every 6 months), part of it fell out without me knowing. The way that it fell out created a pocked in the tooth to harbor food. I brush my teeth 2-3 times a day and floss as well as use mouthwash. I do not eat a lot of sugary foods. But the way the pocket was, the dentist explained it, made it hard to get clean with brushing. I was told by the fill in dentist this time that if a filling is done right it should not come apart like mine did. And that was not my fault (Her words). I also didn't say I didn't appreciate what they were doing for me. The dentist I go to is a national chain and have two or three rotating dentists so I don't always have the same one. And from year to year some can get transferred or leave the practice. Then the fact that my first restorative filling since I was 12, falls out. I am used to a family dentist (Moved a few years back) that I have known most my life and had no problems, all of a sudden I have this issue. Anyways that was not why I was posting. I was posting for some advise so I could seek the right dentist or know what to look for. I did not come here for a critique on oral hygiene which you incorrectly assumed without all the information. All I was looking for was some advise from those who know more than I do. I am trying to learn more about what I can do to help me.

     
    Mizmelzy, Apr 5, 2018
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  5. Mizmelzy

    Mizmelzy

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    Thank you for that information. I will definitely look into this! ;)

     
    Mizmelzy, Apr 5, 2018
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