What to do about a faulty new crown?


Joined
Jun 25, 2019
Messages
5
Best answers
0
1600390888399.png


So, I think about a year or so ago, I posted on this forum about whether I should get a crown or not. I ended up getting the crown. Now, this full zirconia crown has a hole in it! It's been LESS than a year. I had this confirmed by my new dentist. She said there's definitely a hole in it and I have to get it replaced.

I've had this crown for less than a year and it's obviously faulty. What options do I have financially? I paid a lot of money to get this crown put in and feel like it was done very poorly. My insurance benefits says they'll only replace a crown that's at least 5 years old. I don't really want to go back to the old dentist even if they offer to do the work for free since I don't trust them. How can I get this covered? I'm so frustrated over this.
 
Ad

Advertisements

honestdoc

Verified Dentist
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Messages
1,028
Best answers
2
Not defending your dentist but perforations on lower 2nd molar crowns happen more often than we like. Those teeth are usually shorter and can lack retention if the dentist shortens the inner structures (prep) more to thicken the crown. Anatomically, the opposing molar has a prominent palatal cusp that can wear down the lower biting surface. On my tooth, the upper molar had worn it down significantly prompting me to wear a bite guard.
 

Dr M

Verified Dentist
Joined
May 31, 2019
Messages
278
Best answers
4
I agree with honestdoc.
I sometimes grind down the opposing tooth if it has a filling on it, in order to reduce the wear on the crown.
 

MattKW

Verified Dentist
Joined
Mar 18, 2018
Messages
1,418
Best answers
1
I'd approach the dentist who did the crown. Politely contact them and send this photo by email, ask them what they would be willing to do about the problem and give them 2 weeks for a response. We all carry insurance and I've used mine a couple of times in my career. Ideally, a zirc crown shouldn't be adjusted, but if necessary, then using a pair of calipers is essential in such a tight spot to keep enough thickness.
When redoing the crown, the tooth will have to be shortened more, and consider a full (precious) gold crown. They are ideal for 2nd molars.
 
Ad

Advertisements

MattKW

Verified Dentist
Joined
Mar 18, 2018
Messages
1,418
Best answers
1
I agree with honestdoc.
I sometimes grind down the opposing tooth if it has a filling on it, in order to reduce the wear on the crown.
Reduction of the opposing tooth should ideally only be done after extra-oral adjustment as far as possible, and then only a little bit of reduction might be needed after cementation. It's nearly always the opposing healthy palatal cusp of the opposing tooth, so it should be kept to a minimum. I've never had the opportunity to reduce a filling in this situation. But if it was a filling, then you would run the risk of not knowing how thick the remaining filling would be after adjustment.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top