Should a fluoride toothpaste be used alone in order to remineralize teeth?

Discussion in 'Patient Forum' started by dentalissues, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. dentalissues

    dentalissues

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    I recently read (what I will refer to as a theory) that generally speaking, you should use one dental remineralization product in the morning and the other at night because if fluoride is mixed with calcium and phosphate they bind together and you literally wash it down your sink. (I believe the author may be referring to specialty, remineralization products.) I see that there is at least one dental rinse on the market whose list of ingredients include some form of fluoride, calcium and phosphates and is to be used after brushing. It seems to me that either there is an inconsistency here, or the binding/wasting theory is wrong, or I am misunderstanding the binding/wasting theory. Can anyone shed some light on this question for me? Thank you.
     
    dentalissues, Mar 14, 2017
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  2. dentalissues

    svor1988

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    I'm a fan of Dr. Scott Frey's perspective. Read his writings on the pH of mouthwashes and the use of fluoride products. My takeaway is that a fluoride toothpaste is best used in the morning, that way the fluoride is available in the mouth through the day as the teeth are exposed to acidic substances, so that the fluoride will replace any OH- lost from the teeth due to the acid.

    He is very critical of most mouthwashes on the market, and I'm in agreement. He says remineralization happens best at a slightly alkaline pH. Anyways, read his stuff he'll say it better than I can.

    The binding/wasting theory as you write seems like a distraction from the big picture. Yes the ions will interact, and you'll loose most of it in the sink, that is a given... they're not all going to deposit on or fill vacancies in your teeth.

    Make sure you understand the dental pellicle as well.
     
    svor1988, Mar 17, 2017
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  3. dentalissues

    dentalissues

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    Thank you so much for your input. It all makes sense and I did look at the doctor's website. If you don't mind though, my only question now is what do you mean by "OH-". I cannot find a reference to it!
     
    dentalissues, Mar 17, 2017
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  4. dentalissues

    dentalissues

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    OK. I found the meaning of "OH-" and how it relates to the dental pellicle. The information you gave me is so very informative. Again, thanks so much.
     
    dentalissues, Mar 18, 2017
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