Sensitivity after tooth filing/grinding:


Joined
May 7, 2014
Messages
2
Hi all. Been dealing with this and it's really stressing me out. Any help would be awesome.

My lower right incisor was knocking against the top teeth after my wisdom teeth were removed, so my dentist filed a millimetre off the top. It stung, and kept stinging for a day afterwards, but died down soon after. After a while, the front tooth next to it began doing the same thing (knocking against my top teeth), so my dentist filed that down too, but in doing so, accidentally ground down the incisor again. It was only for a second when he slipped over, but there was immediate pain. It went, and then came back perhaps an hour later. The pain has since grown, and my tooth feels very sensitive and cold, like when you drink ice water. Immediately after the grinding, the tooth felt hot/cold. Now it's mainly just a cold pressure. It's just on that tooth, and it has been perhaps twice as long since the pain died down the last time. I've tried drinking water, and it only gets super cold on the incisor.

Do I have permanent nerve damage? Would I know if my inner enamel was completely exposed? Will the pain die down? What should I do?

I can't find anything on the internet (typing grind comes up with grinding teeth at night - typing filing teeth comes up with stories about fillings), and I don't want to go back to my dentist without cause and pay more. Any help would be super. I am having terrible anxiety about now having to live my life with an exposed nerve or something, and feeling the sensitivity forever. :(
 
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Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
151
Adjusting the bite doesn't normally cause pain unless too much of your natural tooth was removed. You can try over the counter sensitivity toothpaste and avoid chewing on that side for a while, but if the pain continues you will need to have it checked. If you still trust the dentist that you saw previously he or she might not charge you to recheck the area. If you no longer trust them a second opinion from another dentist may be a good idea.
 
Joined
May 7, 2014
Messages
2
Adjusting the bite doesn't normally cause pain unless too much of your natural tooth was removed. You can try over the counter sensitivity toothpaste and avoid chewing on that side for a while, but if the pain continues you will need to have it checked. If you still trust the dentist that you saw previously he or she might not charge you to recheck the area. If you no longer trust them a second opinion from another dentist may be a good idea.

Thanks for your reply. I'm dubious about going back to the dentist, but will probably if it doesn't die down. If the pain *doesn't* go away however, and say, they removed too much of the natural tooth, what options would I have? I wouldn't have to have anything serious like a root canal would I? Couldn't they just add something to the top of the tooth or something?
 
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Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
151
It's difficult to say without seeing the tooth. A bonded filling may help, but if the nerve is damaged a root canal would be needed. Let's hope that the tooth settles down on it's own.:)
 

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