Impacted wisdom teeth. Need advice

Joined
Aug 24, 2022
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5
Hello! I'm 30 y.o. and I have 4 fully impacted wisdom teeth (attached pic). I've had different opinions throughout the years from several dentists on what to do with them.

1) Remove all of them
2) Remove only the bottom once, because the top teeth don't really push on others and can't be reached with the dental instrument, so it's likely okay to leave them as it is.
3) Leave them be

I wanted to mention that my brother, who is now 38, never had his removed and he is doing fine. I had a problem once with enlarged and painful gum on one of them, but I got some antibacterial spray, stopped using my tongue to push food in there, and it never came back.
I really don't want to extract them. Dental work is almost always painful for me even with numbing injections. I'm very worried about damaging nerves and other complications. I've also heard that it can change your face shape.
I had experiences in my life where I've done myself a disfavour by excessive health care, and I don't want to repeat these mistakes.
 

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MattKW

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I would advise that at least the lower wisdoms be removed. You've already had gum infection once, and that means (and shows on Xray) that there is a likely communication with bacteria from your mouth. Sure, you're going OK now and prob in fairly good health.
But in 40 years time when you're in on multiple medications because of multiple medical issues, you'll be at much higher risk of developing wisdom teeth problems, you'll be medically harder to manage for the oral surgeon, and you won't heal so well, so that's not something you'll want. And what guarantees are there that you'll be able to maintain your teeth as well as you do now? You might have arthritis, dementia, ... possibly in a nursing home.
My father had a major stroke at age 63 and in the next 6 months before he died, I don't think nursing staff ever brushed his teeth AT ALL. He developed pneumonia and that took him out; I still wonder if part of that was related to the non-existent dental care he received.
Go to an oral surgeon now for opinion and good talk about risks at this stage in your life as opposed to later in life. If you were 20 years younger I'd do you in my general practice, but now you're almost 40 and the adjacent lower molars have had some nice RCTs.
... and your face shape doesn't change after taking out wisdoms. We all get older and saggy!
 

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Joined
Nov 7, 2023
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Managing influenced insight teeth can be genuinely overpowering, however you're in good company, and there are answers for consider.

Most importantly, talk with a mindful dental specialist or oral specialist who can evaluate what is happening. They will give counsel on whether insight teeth evacuation is fundamental. This system can forestall future torment, contaminations, and dental complexities.

It's normal to have worries about the interaction, including the medical procedure itself and recuperation. Your dental group will direct you through each step, from the underlying assessment to post-usable consideration. They'll guarantee you're basically as agreeable as conceivable during the strategy and recuperation.

Keep in mind, tending to affected astuteness teeth is an interest in your drawn out dental wellbeing and generally prosperity. Make sure to proficient exhortation and backing; they're there to assist you with exploring this dental excursion with care and compassion.
 

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Joined
Dec 19, 2023
Messages
2
Hello! I'm 30 y.o. and I have 4 fully impacted wisdom teeth (attached pic). I've had different opinions throughout the years from several dentists on what to do with them.

1) Remove all of them
2) Remove only the bottom once, because the top teeth don't really push on others and can't be reached with the dental instrument, so it's likely okay to leave them as it is.
3) Leave them be

I wanted to mention that my brother, who is now 38, never had his removed and he is doing fine. I had a problem once with enlarged and painful gum on one of them, but I got some antibacterial spray, stopped using my tongue to push food in there, and it never came back.
I really don't want to extract them. Dental work is almost always painful for me even with numbing injections. I'm very worried about damaging nerves and other complications. I've also heard that it can change your face shape.
I had experiences in my life where I've done myself a disfavor by excessive health care, and I don't want to repeat these mistakes.
 

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Joined
Dec 19, 2023
Messages
2
Najmi Dental impacted wisdom teeth, I understand the discomfort and concerns this issue can bring. It's essential to consult with a qualified dentist to address this problem effectively. In some cases, impacted wisdom teeth might affect surrounding teeth or cause pain, necessitating extraction.

If anyone in the Fairfield area is seeking professional advice or assistance, I highly recommend considering a consultation with a reputable cosmetic dentist in Fairfield. They can provide tailored solutions and guidance to manage impacted wisdom teeth while considering aesthetic concerns.
 

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Joined
Oct 18, 2023
Messages
22
1. Remove all of them: This would eliminate the risk of future problems, such as pain, infection, damage to other teeth, and cysts.
  • Drawbacks: This is the most invasive option and carries the highest risk of complications, such as nerve damage, bleeding, and dry sockets. It can also be the most expensive option.

2. Remove only the bottom two: This would address the immediate concern of the lower wisdom teeth potentially causing problems.
  • Drawbacks: The upper wisdom teeth could still cause problems in the future, requiring additional surgery later. This option may not be feasible if the upper wisdom teeth are difficult to access.

3. Leave them be: This avoids the risks and costs of surgery.
  • Drawbacks: There is a risk of developing problems in the future, such as pain, infection, damage to other teeth, and cysts. These problems can be more difficult and expensive to treat than preventive removal.
 

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