Latest thinking on dental rinses


Joined
Feb 26, 2021
Messages
3
Many years ago when I started with Colgate Plax (alcohol), I used it before brushing to loosen the plaque. Some people use dental rinse after (but I think it is better to leave some toothpaste on for the flouride to work). More recently many are switching to alcohol free (I assume because of the cancer risk of alcohol?).
Are the old alcohol rinses actually more effective? Should it be used before or after brushing? Or in the middle of the day as an extra dose of flouride? (I have a few fillings so I tend to get all the dental product help i can.)
 
Ad

Advertisements

honestdoc

Verified Dentist
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Messages
1,218
Solutions
164
I'm not a big fan of rinses. I don't like the potential for chemical irritation on the gum and fragile cheek tissues. From my observations, it seem to bring out the laziness in many people. "I'm too tired to brush and floss so I rinse instead." Modern rinses are becoming alcohol free due to the irritation of alcohol. It seemed that during Covid times, the non-alcohol prescription rinse (Chlorhexidine 0.12% Paroex) are not available for the longest time.
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2021
Messages
3
Thanks honestdoc.
Reading a little, this
Preshaw, P. Mouthwash use and risk of diabetes. Br Dent J 225, 923–926 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.1020
is interesting, "on the role of oral bacteria in the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway and potential impacts of antibacterial mouthwash on the oral microbiome".
Wonder if it was backed up by further research.
Maybe mouthwash killing too many bacteria is worse than we thought years ago. No nitrate-reducing oral bacteria to process my nitrates!
 
Ad

Advertisements

honestdoc

Verified Dentist
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Messages
1,218
Solutions
164
Thank you for that article. According to the author, With respect to mouthwash use, my general opinion is that (in the context of periodontal diseases), for the vast majority of patients, mouthwash use won't achieve a clinically relevant benefit over and above that achieved by effective mechanical plaque control (that is, brushing and interproximal cleaning), and certainly should not be regarded as a substitute for ineffective mechanical plaque control. I also think that while at present there are insufficient firm data to advise patients to stop using mouthwash because of risk of adverse general health effects.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top