Ageing, bone loss, pockets and bad breath


Joined
Oct 20, 2022
Messages
4
I'm 63 and I'm told I have 30% bone loss (X ray - which also eliminated other issues - I have a sideways widsom tooth inside the gum not thought to play a role here). I maintain excellent oral hygeine but recently notice a bad smell.
I found if I squeeze the gum behind my back-most lower molar there is an oozing and the smell.
I am told this is inevitable with ageing - bone loss creates a gap into which food can go where it rots.

They say there is little to be done.
Sometimes they extract the tooth and the gum heals and closes the pocket and that's a permanent fix
but there'a also a risk of permanent nerve damage making half the lower jaw and half the tongue numb
- so it's not for the feint-hearted.

I've seen three dentists, all saying approximately the same thing.

Firstly, does this diagnosis and prognosis look right to you?

Secondly, I find fastidious brushing, flossing once daily, water-flowwing twice daily and salt-water puddling in that area whilst massaging the gums keeps things manageable. But does anyone have any advice on how to manage this better? Are there down-sides to what I'm doing?

Thirdly, I am surprised there is no modern polymer gloop which can be applied to fill the pocket, alleviating the issue. Anyone know of any such thing?

Forthly, I can envisage a syringe or water pump (or a water flosser) fitted with a thin tube and a right-angle bend, which could be used to direct a flushing solution accurately at or even below the gumline to effective flush out and sterilise the pocket with mouth wash. Does anyone know of such a product or see problems with me making one?

Fifthly, I know that exercise slows bone loss generally and I'm wondering if som kind of biting or chewing exercise might do the same in the lower jaw. Anyone?

Sixthly - any religious person want to explain this particular of our Lord's myterious ways? lol

Anything else? Growing old is bad enough without having to live with this.

Thanks
Chris
 
Last edited:
Ad

Advertisements

Dr M

Verified Dentist
Joined
May 31, 2019
Messages
977
Solutions
112
Good day

Do you perhaps have any x-rays that you can attach in order for us to comment? Bone loss might also be an indication of periodontal disease.
 

Vote:
Joined
Apr 24, 2022
Messages
45
Goto a Craniofacial plastic surgeon examination. I had faced alot due to dentist negligence. I had a severe infection as they neglected my upper molar palatal root lesion ( which shown only in my CBCT . IOPA , OPG came as nothing abnormal). Later dentist all here in my area said it's risky as my infection cause palatal damage from hard palate to soft palate and towards pterygoid process region ( as dentist kept me on steroid and antioxidants from Feb to Sept )

Later i travelled almost 2600km to Nagarcoil , India near Kanyakumari to me Meet Craniofacial plastic surgeon Mr Sunil Richardson. Who not just treated my condition, he immediately corrected Mt palate deformity and maxillary jaw bone deformity as well as immediate bone graft and released me after 10 days saying revisit me after 3 months and if all good during follow up i will get my implant . I had lost my two teeth , they had to do resection of pterygoid bone as well as palatal surgery. Believe me my experience is like what a doctor , he wasted no time , 7 person team they put me in general anaesthesia and the surgery took almost 6 hrs . Now I am as good as last year. Risk involved Greater palatine nerve but it's a wonderful outcome . I don't know how he did that but I am good as i was
 
Last edited:

Vote:
Joined
Oct 20, 2022
Messages
4
Good day

Do you perhaps have any x-rays that you can attach in order for us to comment? Bone loss might also be an indication of periodontal disease.
Thanks for your reply. I've asked the dentist for a copy of the Xray but these are commonly denied her ewin the UK. If I can get it I will post it. But even if it is what you say, which is to be done?

Thanks,
Chris
 

Vote:
Joined
Oct 20, 2022
Messages
4
Goto a Craniofacial plastic surgeon examination. I had faced alot due to dentist negligence. I had a severe infection as they neglected my upper molar palatal root lesion ( which shown only in my CBCT . IOPA , OPG came as nothing abnormal). Later dentist all here in my area said it's risky as my infection cause palatal damage from hard palate to soft palate and towards pterygoid process region ( as dentist kept me on steroid and antioxidants from Feb to Sept )

Later i travelled almost 2600km to Nagarcoil , India near Kanyakumari to me Meet Craniofacial plastic surgeon Mr Sunil Richardson. Who not just treated my condition, he immediately corrected Mt palate deformity and maxillary jaw bone deformity as well as immediate bone graft and released me after 10 days saying revisit me after 3 months and if all good during follow up i will get my implant . I had lost my two teeth , they had to do resection of pterygoid bone as well as palatal surgery. Believe me my experience is like what a doctor , he wasted no time , 7 person team they put me in general anaesthesia and the surgery took almost 6 hrs . Now I am as good as last year. Risk involved Greater palatine nerve but it's a wonderful outcome . I don't know how he did that but I am good as i was
Eeek. I cannot afford private treatment, and here in the UK there is virtually no prospect of seeing a craniofacial surgeon for my complaint.

But thanks for your time anyway.

Chris
 

Vote:
Joined
Oct 20, 2022
Messages
4
Good day

Do you perhaps have any x-rays that you can attach in order for us to comment? Bone loss might also be an indication of periodontal disease.
Another update. The dentist sent htis report:

"you have first steps of periodontal disease, you have quite deep pockets on your LR6 and LR7 teeth. The LR7 is impacted which is coming in at an angle which has caused significant bone loss in the area where you are getting food stuck. It would be an idea to book a periodontal exam with your dentist or a deep clean, as advised LR7 to be removed as it is causing decay on LR6."

The X-ray is included.
 

Attachments

  • teggies.jpg
    teggies.jpg
    78.2 KB · Views: 4

Vote:
Ad

Advertisements

Dr M

Verified Dentist
Joined
May 31, 2019
Messages
977
Solutions
112
Usually for any periodontal related issues, it is best to go for an evaluation with a periodontist. He will also most likely advise you to remove the impacted tooth.
 

Vote:

Dr M

Verified Dentist
Joined
May 31, 2019
Messages
977
Solutions
112
Impacted wisdom, especially partially impacted wisdom teeth, often lead to areas where food gets trapped and then can cause localized areas of bone loss, and also cavity formation on the adjacent teeth.
 

Vote:
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Sep 15, 2022
Messages
5
also cavity formation on the adjacent teeth.
That's the reason my periodontist gave me. I asked him specifically why they had to be removed since they've been there causing me no discomfort etc for, I don't know, 40 plus years!

One of mine is horizontal but both are fully impacted (non visible)
 

Vote:

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top