Upper and lower jaw position and tongue position


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Jun 8, 2014
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I know this may seem a strange question. I have tried to ask friends this question all I just get in reply is "I don't know really"

Due to various issues from the middle of January to September, I was only able to wear my upper dentures. That at the end of beginning of September I got a full set of implants fitted in my upper and lower jaw. I have had them in for 6 days.

I am struggling with the implants in one aspect. I forget how my lower jaw should be in my resting state and where my tongue should be in my resting state. What I mean by that is say I am doing something like driving, reading, watching TV, etc and my face is in a resting relaxed state (not smiling, frowning, etc). How should my lower jaw be and where should my tongue be?

When you are watching tv, reading or driving is it A or B for you?

A) Are your upper and lower teeth touching each other?

In other words, is your mouth/jaws closed tightish shut and the lower and upper teeth slightly clenched together. Upper teeth sitting firmly on the lower teeth.

Or is it for you

B Are your upper and lower teeth not touching each other?

Jaws not fully closed, mouth not fully shut but, not open-mouthed. Lower and upper teeth not touching but very close to touching. You have about a 1 to 2 millimeter space between all the upper and lower teeth.
 
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When my face and lower jaw are in a relaxed state where should my tongue be?

When you are in a relaxed state is your tongue touching the roof of your mouth? If it does touch the roof of your mouth is your tongue touching the upper jaw front teeth or is your tongue further back touching the middle of the roof of your tongue?
 
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honestdoc

Verified Dentist
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Jun 14, 2018
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When you are at rest, your teeth should be about quarter inch to 1/3 inch apart (or about 1 cm). Your tongue position may vary. If your tongue is higher above you lower teeth, it may block your airway particularly during sleep which could cause sleep apnea. It is favorable if your tongue rests as low as possible.
 

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