Tooth/Jaw Hurts After Two White Composite Fillings Done

Discussion in 'Dental Archive' started by Paula, Dec 12, 2003.

  1. Paula

    Paula Guest

    Hi - wondering if anyone out there has experienced the same thing, or
    are dentists that can comment.

    My husband has a lot of old mercury fillings that were decaying and
    needing replacement. He went to our dentist to get the first two done
    (lowers) and everything went fine. A few weeks later, he went to get
    two more done (upper part of his mouth), but since then has been in a
    lot of pain (it's been 2 weeks). It hurts to chew on that side, the
    teeth are sensitive (which are two symptoms that I have experienced
    before after getting fillings) - but what is of more concern to me is
    that he is in a lot of pain when he is not eating, too. Toothache
    pain and headache pain. My husband never takes any aspirin and he's
    been popping Motrin like candy. He went back to the dentist to
    enquire about the prolonged pain and the dentist told him to wait a
    while and brush with sensodyne toothpaste.

    I've read on this newsgroup that white composites can be problematic
    (pulp not being sealed properly and therefore causing pain afterwards
    OR composite/amalgum cracking afterwards). I've also read that
    drilling a tooth can cause trauma which could lead to the tooth
    requiring a root canal. I've had this happen to me before, but
    usually it's a cusp-crack issue (and therefore would only hurt when I
    eat). I cannot personally comment on why my husband would be getting
    severe toothaches and headaches. I worry about infection or absess,
    but there is no swelling or redness.

    Any ideas what this could be? Is the dentist correct in stating my
    husband should just wait it out for a while longer?

    Thanks,
    Paula
     
    Paula, Dec 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. On 11 Dec 2003 22:57:58 -0800, (Paula) wrote:
    OK, quite a coincidence, but okay.
    Either air bubble under the filling or the beginnings of an abscess.
    This could mean root canal therapy and crown.
    Ummmm, nope.
    You are a careful reader ,,,,,,,, this makes our typing increasingly
    justified!

    Trauma from drilling, incorrect placement, no flowable under the
    restoration, improper curing,

    Many possibilities.

    (1) Is the tooth heat or pressure sensitive?

    Joel


    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

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    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
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    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Dec 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. Paula

    Io Guest

    My husband has a lot of old mercury fillings that were decaying and
    Did this dentist observe proper procedures for removing the mercury
    fillings?

    http://www.mercurypoisoned.com
     
    Io, Dec 12, 2003
    #3
  4. That includes bowing and curtseying ... I suppose?


    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

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    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
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    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Dec 12, 2003
    #4
  5. Paula

    Tony Bad Guest

    irrelevant to the question asked...the issue in this case is not mercury
    poisoning

    T
     
    Tony Bad, Dec 12, 2003
    #5
  6. *IF* you be wanting to avoid mercury poisoning I mean POISONING!!!!!!!
    then you get what you deserve!!!!!!!!!!!

    This sounds goofy I know ,,,, Its written a la Jan style.


    Joel

    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

    Dental health-related material
    is provided for information purposes
    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
    that patient or is familiar with
    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Dec 12, 2003
    #6
  7. Paula

    matt Guest


    Shows what you know. If the mercury was removed without following procedure
    many problems can be caused. Pain in the jaw is just one such problem.
     
    matt, Dec 12, 2003
    #7
  8. Paula

    Tony Bad Guest

    The pattern of pain described is fairly typical of many common dental issues
    that arise when performing ANY type of dental work, regardless of whether
    amalgam is involved. (as Dr. Fawks explained already) If your first conclusion
    is that "mercury" is an issue when faced with such symptoms, your diagnostic
    skills are sorely lacking. (do you have any?) I understand the feelings of many
    when it comes to amalgam, but you lose credibility when you have the same answer
    to every question.

    T
     
    Tony Bad, Dec 12, 2003
    #8
  9. Paula

    WB Guest


    Shoes what you know.
    There is no such thing as a mercury filling.

    There is however, such a thing as silver amalgam.

    From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) :

    Amalgam \A*mal"gam\, n. [F. amalgame, prob. fr. L. malagma, Gr.
    ?, emollient, plaster, poultice, fr. ? to make soft, fr. ?
    soft.]
    1. An alloy of mercury with another metal or metals; as, an
    amalgam of tin, bismuth, etc.

    Note: Medalists apply the term to soft alloys generally.

    2. A mixture or compound of different things.

    3. (Min.) A native compound of mercury and silver.
     
    WB, Dec 12, 2003
    #9
  10. That's news to me! How would you suppose mercury could cause pain?

    Joel


    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

    Dental health-related material
    is provided for information purposes
    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
    that patient or is familiar with
    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Dec 12, 2003
    #10
  11. Oh my God! I just read about the man who had to be rushed to the
    hospital in acute pain for touching mercury ........ I think I read it
    ......... ???????

    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

    Dental health-related material
    is provided for information purposes
    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
    that patient or is familiar with
    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Dec 12, 2003
    #11
  12. EXTREMELY painful, that mercury!
    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

    Dental health-related material
    is provided for information purposes
    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
    that patient or is familiar with
    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Dec 12, 2003
    #12
  13. Paula

    matt Guest

    I agree with you, I was just playing.
     
    matt, Dec 12, 2003
    #13
  14. Many have been poisoned by amalgams ........ Ask Jan.


    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

    Dental health-related material
    is provided for information purposes
    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
    that patient or is familiar with
    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Dec 12, 2003
    #14
  15. humor


    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

    Dental health-related material
    is provided for information purposes
    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
    that patient or is familiar with
    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Dec 12, 2003
    #15
  16. I call them platinum fillings (I charge more, much more).

    They are really mercury.


    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

    Dental health-related material
    is provided for information purposes
    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
    that patient or is familiar with
    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Dec 12, 2003
    #16
  17. Paula

    matt Guest

    The name is rather unimportant really. Although calling it a silver anything
    is misleading since they're around 50% mercury with silver content being
    much less. But silver is a nice shiny metal that people associate with
    jewelry, so dentists prefer to name the fillings after that rather than
    being more responsible and letting their patients know that they're putting
    large chunks of toxic metal in their mouths.
     
    matt, Dec 12, 2003
    #17
  18. The proper term is Amalgam period. (meaning a mixure of metals)

    yes the filling looks silver so the lay person calls it a silver
    filling
    but to be politically correct it is actually a mercury filling since
    amalgam composition is about 50% mercury 45% silver and 5% trace
    metals such as zinc, copper, etc... By the way mercury has a silver
    colour to it as well.
    We dentists do not like to call it mercury because it deters the
    public from getting it put in.

    Alexander Vasserman DDs., BS.
    www.smilesbyalex.com

    (ChuckMSRD) wrote in message news:<>...
     
    Alexander Vasserman DDS., BS., Dec 13, 2003
    #18
  19. Paula

    Dr. Steve Guest

    Sure sounds a lot like a lady dentist I know of in Scotland. Pain is not
    normal. Some discomfort is expected, but not what you describe. Either the
    teeth were so bad that the teeth were doomed to needing root canal therapy
    prior to treatment, or the dentist trained with that lady in Scotland.

    --
    `~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~
    Stephen Mancuso, D.D.S.
    Troy, Michigan USA
    =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=
    ..
    news:...
     
    Dr. Steve, Dec 13, 2003
    #19
  20. Paula

    matt Guest

    That's appalling. You ought to never work in dentistry again for not only
    risking peoples health but knowlingly deceiving them as well.
     
    matt, Dec 13, 2003
    #20
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