Should you have a root canal if you have no pain?

Discussion in 'Dental Archive' started by Lori, Jan 13, 2004.

  1. Lori

    Lori Guest

    Here is my story....

    when I was about 10 years old, I had a very large cavity in one of the
    molars on the bottom right side of my mouth. Over the years, this
    tooth has developed cavities on the sides of and underneath the
    filling, which caused me to have the filling redrilled a handful of
    times.

    In June of 2003, my tooth began to hurt, sensitive to hot and cold, so
    my dentist said that I might need a root canal. She referred me to a
    specialist. The specialist did a test, and he eventually said that he
    thought that I should get a root canal.

    I have a root canal appointment scheduled for tomorrow, but I am not
    sure if I should go or not. My tooth has not hurt me again since the
    summer. If I don't feel any pain, should I actually bother to get a
    root canal, or should I wait for some type of pain?

    My tooth is probably about 90% filling at this point. The plan was to
    get a root canal then to get a cap put on it. I'm not sure of what
    the best thing is to do. I don't want to get a root canal if I don't
    need one, but I also don't want to NOT get one, and have it backfire
    on me later on.

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
     
    Lori, Jan 13, 2004
    #1
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  2. Lori wrote:
    Based upon your description, the nerve is almost certainly infected.
    Do not wait for this to hurt. The tooth should either have root canal
    treatment and be restored, or be extracted. The decision as to whether
    the tooth should be saved or not depends upon how strong the remaining
    tooth is, whether there is any gum disease involving the tooth, what your
    financial resources are, and whether you would be inclined to replace the
    tooth should it be lost.
    Most of my patients with restorable, periodontally sound teeth are
    advised to have root canal and crown. There are some offices that are
    quicker to extract teeth and have them replaced with implants.
    Unfortunately I have many patients that either can't afford or aren't
    motivated enough to save or replace teeth. If any issues such as money,
    fear or inconvenience are a factor in making your decision, we can discuss
    them.

    Steve
     
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS, Jan 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. Lori

    Martik Guest

    I would never get another crown if I could avoid it because if you have a
    problem underneath the crown the whole crown must be replaced at
    considerable cost. My dentist recommends the composite white fillings which
    can be repaired.
     
    Martik, Jan 13, 2004
    #3
  4. Lori

    Dr Steve Guest

    But,, how often?

    --
    ~+--~+--~+--~+--~+--
    Stephen Mancuso, D.D.S.
    Troy, Michigan, USA
    Let me know if you need my email address
    .....................................................

    This posting is intended for informational or conversational purposes only.
    Always seek the opinion of a licensed dental professional before acting on
    the advice or opinion expressed here. Only a dentist who has examined you
    in person can diagnose your problems and make decisions which will affect
    your health.
    .......................
     
    Dr Steve, Jan 13, 2004
    #4
  5. Lori

    WB Guest

    On 13 Jan 2004 11:06:20 -0800, (Lori) wrote:

    Currently it is considered that the pulp usually cannot withstand
    more than two operation traumas.

    Get the RCT and the Crown.
    Chances are the pulp is already necrotic (dead)

    WB
     
    WB, Jan 13, 2004
    #5
  6. Lori

    Martik Guest

    Maybe every 5 years? At $900/crown and $60/filling repair I can get many
    repairs before reaching the price of the crown.
     
    Martik, Jan 13, 2004
    #6
  7. Lori

    WB Guest

    Some teeth can only be restored with a crown.
    Endodontically treated teeth should be restored
    with a crown except in a few specific instances.

    WB
     
    WB, Jan 13, 2004
    #7
  8. Lori

    WB Guest

    Sounds like 'patchwork' dentistry to me.
    Have seen many crown still in service 30 yrs later.

    WB
     
    WB, Jan 13, 2004
    #8
  9. Lori

    Martik Guest

    Let me provide some history:

    My dentist passed on and his replacement advised me to replace 6 out of 8
    crowns and new crowns of 3 endo'd molars. Total bill $9000. I really did not
    like her attitude and none of my existing crowns were troublesome so I
    switched to a new dentist. He said all my existing crowns were ok but a
    couple could have been fitted better (margins?). For the other 3 molars he
    recommended that I fill them with this composite material that would be
    almost as strong as a crown. Of course, his recommendation was influenced by
    my objections to paying $900/crown. Anyways, it cost approx $300 vs $2700
    and I have had no problems with any of the fillings for 2-3 years.
     
    Martik, Jan 14, 2004
    #9
  10. How come I was expecting these links .....?

    On 14 Jan 2004 04:48:21 GMT, (Jan) wrote:
    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

    Dental health-related material
    is provided for information purposes
    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
    that patient or is familiar with
    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Jan 14, 2004
    #10
  11. Lori

    Lori Guest

    I just wanted to say thank you for your advice. It's refreshing to
    hear other professionals' opinions on it.

    I am going to plan to go ahead and get the root canal done today.
    Given that I do have pretty good dental insurance right now (metlife)
    I am going to go ahead with the cap too. (I take it cap and crown are
    synonomous.)

    Thanks again for responding. It's appreciated.


     
    Lori, Jan 14, 2004
    #11
  12. On 14 Jan 2004 06:32:59 -0800, (Lori) wrote:
    Yes, another term is PFM, or porcelain-fused-to-metal.

    --
    Joel M. Eichen, .
    Philadelphia PA

    DISCLAIMER FOLLOWS:

    *********

    Dental health-related material
    is provided for information purposes
    only and does not necessarily
    represent endorsement by or an official
    position of the SciMedDentistry gang
    or any other official agency either
    actual or fictitious or Steve Mancuso.

    Advice on the treatment or care
    of an individual patient should
    be obtained through consultation
    with a dentist who has examined
    that patient or is familiar with
    that patient's dental history.

    STANDARD DISCLAIMER
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Jan 14, 2004
    #12
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