Sensitive tooth but no cavity


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May 27, 2013
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Hi there. I went to the dentist two days ago because I have some tooth pain on one of the bottom front teeth. Basically it is very irritating, I guess I could perhaps say that the pain is kind of like a cold sensation. Coldness, chewing, and air does not seem to make it worse. The dentist took several x rays and examined the tooth and determined I did not have a cavity. Since the pain had just started the night before, I didn't worry about it, thinking it would go away. However, it has remained steady. I do frequently bite my nails, and it is the main tooth I use to bite my nails, and have several hairline fractures on the irritated tooth and the tooth next to it. I had read that cracks in the tooth could cause irritation, and I don't know if the dentist examined me with a light. Is this a possibility? What other things could cause this pain, and will it go away? What can I do? Thank you so much for all time, I really appreciate it.
 
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Joined
Jun 1, 2013
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It's a good possibility that you are suffering from enamel erosion, so perhaps you should rule out some common contributors. There are a few things you can actually be doing on a daily basis to reduce tooth sensitivity if this is the case. Go easy on the mouthwash, as many brands have a very high acidic content and can be harsh on enamel. Reduce citrus and fruit juice consumption, and if you're going to continue to enjoy these in your diet, do so sparingly, or consume acid-neutralizing foods afterwards, such as milk and cheese.

Receding gum line is another problem that can contribute to mouth sensitivity, but this really targets the exposed roots of your teeth. Have your doctor rule out periodontal disease as a factor. Brushing too hard can also cause pain, so if you're a hard brusher, invest in an extra-soft bristled toothbrush. And, yes, cracks can also contribute to pain, as bacteria has a greater chance of seeping into more porous areas and can easily become inflamed.

These are just some common possibilities, but always consult with your doctor for a thorough evaluation and correct diagnosis. Hope this helps!

Greg "Orthodontist" Burnett, RecordLinc.com

For additional dental care tips and related news, follow RecordLinc Inc.on Google+
 

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