Receded gums at 27

Discussion in 'Periodontics' started by CHaynes, Dec 6, 2017.

  1. CHaynes

    CHaynes

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    Hi guys,

    Just thought I would post to see if I can get some advice and support on some dental issues I have.

    Basically I didn’t go to a dentist for many years for various reasons, partly as my personal circumstances were quite tumultuous but also because it just didn’t occur to me.

    A few years ago I started brushing too hard but didn’t realise as wasn’t in pain and didn’t really notice any symptoms and this has caused the gums on some of my teeth to recede a bit. I have no tooth decay although my teeth are a bit discoloured from the heavy brushing.

    My dad has severe periodontitis and extremely receded gums on lower jaw causing loss of 4 teeth so far and will eventually need dentures as he used to not bother brushing his teeth.

    My mum has some slight receded gum from brushing too much. This has happened in a different way so that it goes deeper into the tooth so she requires fillings in these areas and also she has to have an extraction due to decay etc.

    I have since started using an oral b electric brush with sensitive head and floss every day. I have no problems eating food or pain and only my teeth are visible when I smile or talk due to low lip line.

    Is there anything I can do about this dental issue I have or just make sure my oral hygiene is really good from now on? I read about gum grafting but the recession is on quite a few teeth.. I was thinking I could have grafts on the worst areas in future as some of the teeth are a little harder to clean effectively due to where the gum receded?

    I appreciate that a lot of people have at least one kind of health issue and am just trying to make sense of this a little

    Thanks
     
    CHaynes, Dec 6, 2017
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  2. CHaynes

    Busybee

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    Gum disease is often hereditary so you may be unlucky but have you seen a dentist for advice on brushing etc? Having a healthy diet, not smoking, eating the right foods for your teeth should all help as does exercise because it gets the circulation going to your gums. Anything that will improve oxygen levels in the gums. But if you see an expert then they may be able to bring your gums back to health with regular deep cleaning etc.
     
    Busybee, Dec 9, 2017
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  3. CHaynes

    CHaynes

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    Hey Busybee,

    Thanks for your reply

    I have seen a dentist and they have said it is not related to gum disease per se but due to heavy brushing, although they did say that plaque build up and slight gum inflammation makes it more vulnerable to being pushed back with poor brushing. They instructed me to use an electric brush with sensitive rotary heads and I use an anti bacterial floss as well.

    I have always had fairly healthy diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables and never smoked, always exercised well also. Although I have suffered from stress and low mood at several times in my life which may have contributed.

    A big part of the problem was that I never went to a dentist for a number of years due to bad personal circumstances and other reasons as they most probably would have picked up on my bad habits during regular visits.

    I have been to see the experts a few times and they said that I should not have any further issues leading to tooth loss or decay although the damage to my gums is done unfortunately. I might look into tissue grafts on worst areas in future as in some areas the teeth are slightly harder to clean now. I go to dentists every six months now for checkup and then a professional cleaning after this appointment to keep everything monitored. Also I don’t have any other health or medical issues.

    Thanks again for reading
     
    CHaynes, Dec 9, 2017
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  4. CHaynes

    Busybee

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    I would not blame yourself for not visiting a dentist. I didn't go once for 7 years and only needed a filling. I am not sure I really needed that. I didn't go again for 7 years and I didn't need anything done. But then we were shown by a nurse at school how to clean our teeth effectively. If you went to the dentist as a child they should have shown you how to look after the gums. It's worth going for regular hygienist visits but I don't think there is much value going to the dentist every six months other than psychological reassurance. Having your teeth professionally cleaned 2-3 times a year should help you. But try not to worry about your gums. You are really lucky not to have decay so it seems you caught it in time and maybe just have the gums checked regularly.
     
    Busybee, Dec 9, 2017
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  5. CHaynes

    CHaynes

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    Busybee,

    Thanks for your kind words.

    I did go to the dentist regularly as a child but stopped when I was in my teens as was no longer available on NHS and nobody explained to me that I needed to go back to a private dentist at some point.

    I received good education on the subject as a child and was shown how to brush and went for regular cleanings but unfortunately I think this level of understanding disappearead over the years where I never went and switched between different types of brushes etc or paid not enough attention to products I was using. Actually a while ago my brother volunteered at a dental practise in South America and he said everyday there were people having half their teeth extracted due to decay, that should have been a catalyst for me to start going back lol

    Ok yes I see your point as the dentist has already explained what I need to do now so I could have cleanings 2-3 times a year and checkup once per year of teeth and gums.

    Also apparently it is fairly common for people to have some areas of gum that have receded as there are various reasons it can happen. For example some people when they smile very broadly and their top lip lifts up you can see that they have a few teeth where the gum pulled back.

    Do you think I should consider seeing a periodontist about tissue grafts on some of the areas where gum receded in the future or maybe just focus on practising good oral hygiene as I am doing now?
     
    CHaynes, Dec 9, 2017
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  6. CHaynes

    Busybee

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    I think you should see a good hygienist a few times a year. A good hygienist will check your gums really carefully and make recommendations. There isn't much point in having invasive dental work if a dentist has said you are ok as you are. Gums have an amazing ability to recover if you are kind to them. If you keep up your hygiene regime and get hygienist advice you may find that at your next dental check up they give you a more positive prognosis. Don't overdo the brushing or obsess, your body does most of the work if you give it a chance. Nothing wrong with seeing a perio for an opinion but maybe you should wait and do some hygiene appointments first?
     
    Busybee, Dec 9, 2017
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  7. CHaynes

    CHaynes

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    Yes they have said I am ok and will not have other issues now with my oral hygiene regime although they said the gum does not heal back to where it was it can just remain clear of inflammation and won’t recede any more.

    Ok yes I think I will have some hygienist appointments first as you say and see how that progresses. Maybe seeing a perio for their opinion is something I can consider in future.

    Actually my dad was recently told he has to be fitted for top and bottom dental plates due to teeth lost from gum disease. At least I will not be losing my teeth for whatever reason.

    Also on a trip abroad I went on recently with a tour operator I saw that it is really common for people to have some kind of health issue, for example one of the people there had diabetes and injected insulin during meals sometimes and somebody else had a damaged shoulder from bike accident and couldn’t put much pressure on it. I think that was psychologically helpful for me to understand that these things happen and it’s how you adapt and learn that matters mostly
     
    CHaynes, Dec 9, 2017
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