Pain after filling

Discussion in 'Patient Forum' started by Z994, Dec 1, 2018.

  1. Z994

    Z994

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    hi,

    I had a filling in my first molar almost 5 weeks ago and yesterday I started to feel pain when drinking and eating. The pain is instantaneous and i stop feeling it immediately after i stop.

    Is this a normal thing?
    I brush my teeth almost 2 a day (sometimes i forget the second time) and floss almost everyday.

    What is happening?
     
    Z994, Dec 1, 2018
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  2. Z994

    honestdoc Verified Dentist

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    There is usually drilling involved to fill the tooth. After drilling, the nerve (pulp) gets traumatized depending on how big and deep the cavity is. The sign of a healthy nerve response is cold sensitivity of short duration. Your teeth is telling you that too much cold can damage the nerve so try not to overwhelm it.
     
    honestdoc, Dec 3, 2018
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  3. Z994

    Z994

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    I also feel the pain for very hot drinks. Is it normal to feel this type of pain when you had a filling more than a month ago?
     
    Z994, Dec 3, 2018
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  4. Z994

    honestdoc Verified Dentist

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    With sensitivity to hot, the tooth may be needing a root canal treatment. Have your dentist check it out.
     
    honestdoc, Dec 3, 2018
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  5. Z994

    MattKW Verified Dentist

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    I always tell patients if I expect them to have some pain afterwards, and for how long. Anything more than a week is of concern. But I also tend to do amalgams in the bigger cavities because there is much less risk of post-op pain than composites. A lousy amalgam can work in lots of messy and difficult situations whereas a composite needs careful placement under ideal conditions.
     
    MattKW, Dec 4, 2018
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  6. Z994

    Z994

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    I went to the dentist yesterday and she tested it, and she took x-rays too. she told me there is not sings of any need for root canal and the cause may be hyper sysitivity. I am doing a follow up in two weeks.

    I have the x-rays too, I am posting them here. can you tell me if you notice anything. AL_ASMAR^ZIAD_MN01_MP05_001.JPG AL_ASMAR^ZIAD_MN01_MP04_000.JPG
     
    Z994, Dec 4, 2018
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  7. Z994

    honestdoc Verified Dentist

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    I'm not seeing anything significant. I believe you have hypersensitivity. Avoid and minimize temperature exposure.
     
    honestdoc, Dec 4, 2018
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  8. Z994

    Z994

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    Thanks a lot! Really appreciated
     
    Z994, Dec 4, 2018
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  9. Z994

    MattKW Verified Dentist

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    Nothing special. It's hard to gauge the depth of the filling because this is an angled X-ray (a PA). You can always try a desensitising toothpaste but it may take a week to kick in. If still no significant relief then I would redo the filling as a first step. You could use composite again, but seeing as it's an upper tooth that's not very visible, I'd tend towards an amalgam the 2nd time around.
     
    MattKW, Dec 5, 2018
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