Normal, or should I get a second opinion?


Joined
Feb 3, 2021
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1
Hi, I recently started going to a new dentist. Prior to this I rarely visited dentists. She seems great, very thorough, and knowledgeable.
Upon check-up she discovered that I needed cavity fillings towards the back teeth. One of which is a wisdom tooth which has never given me issues.
While performing the filling she couldn’t believe how much decay she found (X-ray didn’t do justice). It ended up being a very deep filling and quite a task for her - especially considering that the tooth was hard to access. 5-6 weeks later, when recovery was expected, I was not able to bite down on hard foods due to pain. I went back to the dentist and she discovered that there was a small crack close to the nerve. She drilled the tooth again and added more filling. There’s actually very little tooth left now, pretty much all filling!
I was told that the problem was fixed and I would be pain free in a matter of about a week.
Well, it’s been a week now and though it is a little better than before, I am still experiencing pain when biting on hard foods and some temperature sensitivity.
I need to get it examined again, this will be the third time working on this tooth.

Is this a somewhat typical situation? - Or should I seek a second opinion? My fear is that she might not be doing a good job and I don’t want to keep going back and having them butcher the tooth away! - I hope this is a typical situation because she’s very likable and seems like she knows what she’s doing
Thanks!
 
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Dr M

Verified Dentist
Joined
May 31, 2019
Messages
396
Solutions
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Good day

It is difficult to give an exact opinion without any x-rays, but if there was such a deep cavity, it might be that the nerve was involved, leading to pulpitis. In such a case, the tooth would need a root canal treatment to be done. If it is a wisdom tooth however, and it is questionable if the tooth can be restored successfully after the root canal treatment, it might be a better option to remove the tooth.
 

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