Multiple crowns to replace fillings

Discussion in 'Dental Restoration' started by Amberfie, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. Amberfie

    Amberfie

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    Hello,
    I am around 30 and have had a history of multiple cavities starting since I was a teenager. I went to a dentist last year who did only composite fillings and had three large fillings replaced. I don’t want amalgam filings. He retired. I just switched to a new dentist who is recommending crowns on almost ALL of my molars (which all have pretty large fillings by now). Instead of waiting until a large filling had a problem, he recommended PREVENTATIVELY replacing each filling with a crown, as I can afford it, over several years. He said the risk of having the large filings is that I might get a crack and would need a root canal, whereas with the crowns it is less likely that I will need root canals because they are much stronger.
    My question is, does this make sense, or is he just trying to make more money?
     
    Amberfie, Jun 13, 2018
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  2. Amberfie

    MattKW Verified Dentist

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    This is fairly typical in dentistry. As the fillings get larger, there comes a point where the remaining thin teeth start fracturing, and a crown will encircle the tooth as the final measure (we hope!). Without seeing any x-rays and photos, I can't be specific about your teeth. All procedures carry some risks, so he has to discuss these with you. If you're not sure, then get a 2nd opinion, and take a copy of your x-rays with you.
     
    MattKW, Jun 14, 2018
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    Amberfie likes this.
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  3. Amberfie

    Amberfie

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    Thanks so much! I was pretty sure crowns would be the next step after the large fillings because several dentists had told me that. I had just nevsr heard of replacing the fillings BEFORE there was another cavity/problem.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 15, 2018
    Amberfie, Jun 15, 2018
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  4. Amberfie

    Busybee

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    I'd say it's a good way to make money. Either way your teeth are likely to fall apart at some point. Conservative dentists deal with the problems when they occur and maintain the status quo of the bite by not making radical changes unless they are clinically necessary at that point. At the end of the day you can pull all your teeth and replace them with implants as a preventative measure...
     
    Busybee, Jun 15, 2018
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  5. Amberfie

    MattKW Verified Dentist

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    A "good way to make money"? Not, it is part of a continuum of treatment until a decision has to be made about whether another refill is going to work. Crowns have life expectancy of 10-15 years, maybe longer. And moving into implants as a "preventative measure"? Implants are costly, and also have life expectancy of 10-15 years, maybe longer.
     
    MattKW, Jun 15, 2018
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  6. Amberfie

    Busybee

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    My comment about implants was tongue in cheek. Point was a dentist can justify most treatments as preventative but dental care is in the long run palliative. It's always wise to seek another opinion in such instances. Ethics can be on a spectrum when money is to be made.
     
    Busybee, Jun 16, 2018
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  7. Amberfie

    MattKW Verified Dentist

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    Okey-dokey. It's hard to convey tongue-in-cheek in text.
     
    MattKW, Jun 16, 2018
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  8. Amberfie

    Amberfie

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    Thanks for the comments! I’ll look for another opinion.
     
    Amberfie, Jul 1, 2018
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