I can see my dentin


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One of the 5 sides of my molar tooth is chipped and i can see a yelloiwish small piece on the back side which is likely dentin please help me can it be repaired with a filling? i had done root canal treatment there but the tooth is still strong can it be fixed with a simple filling please im so anxious im having an appointment tomorrow and im afraid if the dentist will say i need extraction or crown even though its just a small piece of tooth
 
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Jan 11, 2020
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I am in a similar boat too, but all my top teeth are beginning to show dentin at the gum line. I shall let you know if I get any information which may help you too.

I think if it is minimal, they may use bonding or tooth coloured cement maybe. Definitely quite commonly fixed without crowns I am told!!
 
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Hey guys,
Dentin showing on the chewing surface and at the gum line - not the same thing. On the chewing surface dentin becomes visible when enamel is gone, is usually related to 1 -mechanical trauma - excessive biting forces to this particular tooth (tooth seats higher than the rest of your dentition or some kind of parafunction (grinding, clenching, biting on an objects...), or 2 - chemical trauma - acidic environment in your mouth ( acidic beverages and foods, tobacco/alcohol, acid reflux/bulimia). Your tooth surfaces wearing down from these and exposing dentin definitely need to be fixed, but exposed dentin at the gumline and on the chewing surfaces are absolutely not the same thing. If more than a third of the chewing surface is exposed dentin, the general protocols call for a crown. Exposed dentin only on the chewing surfaces most likely means that you are bruxing (grinding) your teeth against one another. Exposed dentin at the gumline from a chip can occur for many more reasons, but if it is relatively small, it can likely be fixed with a simple filling.
 
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Very informative thanks. Most of my upper teeth at the gumline are showing dentin progressing down, and it has happened over the last year or two. Would bonding be an option if it is just cosmetic?

P.S Never had a filling no issue on the chewing surface, and teeth have been looked after always!! Thanks again!!
 
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It sounds like predominantly gum problem. I would check two things : 1- the way you bite down / bring your teeth together. If during chewing or even just swallowing your saliva you put too much pressure on the side of your teeth, you might start losing gum and underlying bone as the result of chronic trauma. 2 - see a gum specialist to check your individual anatomy, it might be the way your jaw was built from the beginning. With first scenario you need some bite correction followed by night guard to prevent further damage and possible gum graft to restore proper teeth support and gum protection if needed. If trauma is not the case, gum graft alone or nothing would be the answer. Of course it could be other explanation as well, but this is what I can tell, based on your problem description.
 
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Cheers doc appreciate that. There doesn’t seem to be any gum receding just less enamel at the top of each tooth. I will look into it, thanks again!!
 
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Well, if your gum is not receding and defects look like wedges, you are talking about enamel dentin junction, where enamel - tissue covering tooth - border with cement - tissue covering root. This area works like stress relief and over prolonged withstanding to excessive stress can be damage. So, you need to check bite forces, brushing technique ( could be too aggressive), toothbrush you use (bristles condition) and do not worry. As long as they are shallow and you do not feel any discomfort, you are on the safe side. If they are getting deeper, do bonding or feelings; deep defects at the enamel dentin junction weaken your teeth and potentially can cause fracture.
 
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Cheers Doc thanks again, think I got the general jist of what you recommend.

Have a good day.

Kind regards,

Stuart.
 
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