Help needed please


Joined
Jul 3, 2018
Messages
6
Hello,
I had a large silicone chin implant placed 20 years ago. (Plastic surgery) I recently decided that I want to have it taken out and was shocked when I began reading about bone erosion being common with these impants - particularly when they are large and incorrectly placed high on the aleovar bone as mine is (it is also off center with more of the mass to the upper right of the midline)
Upon pulling down my lower lip I notice that I have signifcant recession of the gingiva/mucosa in the vestibule which would indicate bone erosion and I think there is a good chance it is at the tooth roots though I have no sensitivity at this point.

I read an instance online where a mandibular advancement was suggested in a case such as mine - my jaw/bite alignment is already correct thus a mandibular advancement alone would not work it would have to be double jaw surgery and this is something I can't do at this point in my life (44 single parent with special needs child). However, I would think the only reason any type of jaw advancement would be prescribed in my instance where jaw/bite alignment is already correct this would be to assist with the aesthetic damage of the bone recession after removing the implant although even in moving the jaw forward the mand symphysis bone erosion would still be present which is the crux of my question:

*In an instance of significant mandibular symphysis erosion is the standard treatment bone grafting assuming proper existing jaw/bite alignment already exists? Also, can synthetic bone grafting or bone paste be used or would it need to be actual bone?

*I do understand that no diagnosis can be made over the web and without x-rays - I was just hoping to learn for discussion purposes and will be pursuing x-rays. Thanks to all of the great contributors here
 
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MattKW

Verified Dentist
Joined
Mar 18, 2018
Messages
1,570
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It's not clear that you actually have bone erosion as a result of the implant. It is more frequent that gum recession simply occurs from periodontal or hygiene issues. You may require no treatment at all, or possibly a skin graft. Before you get too worked up over this, I'd go see a dentist and then possibly a periodontist.
 
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