Gum disease or infection?


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I suffer from anxiety and during lock down my anxiety has grown. I have anxiety over my teeth that comes and goes and recently it's been very bad.

I went to a new hygienist and dentist 2 weeks ago and while they say I have "historical gum disease" in some of my back teeth" they both said it isn't a problem at the moment. There was no bleeding on probing and my pockets were between 0 and 3. I brush twice, floss once or twice everyday and use mouthwash daily and saltwater rinses a few times a week.

However, my back left wisdom tooth had to be removed about 2 months ago as it had severe bone loss. The hygienist told me that sometimes the wisdom teeth don't have as much bone as other teeth, is this right?!

Also the 2nd molar next to that wisdom tooth (that's now been extracted) has a lot of gum recession and the dentist said it could be due to the tooth having a deep filling.

My teeth also are a bit misaligned and I clench/grind my teeth often, especially when i'm stressed (I'm trying to stop this when I become aware of doing it).

I had an examination and x rays taken at the dentist (but don't have access to them).

I'm worried about the gum recession though and not sure why it is happening. I'm so concerned that every time I brush/floss (use interdental brushes), that I think I see bits of 'gum' that I spit out. Even though I actually can't be sure that I'm right and it isn't just bits of food from what I've eaten.

Could I have an infection or problem under the filling or could I still have active gum disease now?

My dentist was happy enough to give me another appointment in 6 months and not sooner....
 
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May 31, 2019
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Good day

It is difficult to give an exact opinion, due to a lack of information---no x-rays or photos etc.
Usually when you floss, it is bits of food that comes out. You won't floss pieces of your gums out.
It is possible that the bone around your upper wisdom tooth, might not have been sufficient. Again difficult to say without an x-ray. Because these areas are usually difficult to keep clean, it is also possible that existing calculus in this area, could have lead to localized recession and bone loss.
When we extract a tooth, the bone in that area gets resorbed over time and the level of bone ( horizontal and vertical ) is also affected. This could lead to some bone loss around the 2nd molar, especially if it was a traumatic extraction.
If you are worried, you are also more than welcome to get a 2nd opinion from another dentist. Especially if you are worried about recession in additional areas.

Just as a side note--you should have access to your own x-rays and records. A dentist is not allowed to keep it from you. Ask for a copy.

Hope this helps!
 
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Thank you for your reply and I understand difficulty of replying without photos and x rays. It's extremely difficult to get photos of the area unfortunately.

The extraction wasn't traumatic, it took about 10 or so minutes to do and I have had no problems with the site since then either.

I get very anxious and paranoid when it comes to my teeth so I may be over worrying. I have another hygiene appointment in a couple of weeks to do a very thorough assessment, I'll wait until then and see what the hygienist says and go from there.

My main worry now is that maybe I need a root canal and not the deep filling in the second molar....I can eat normally, don't have any pain when I chew on it and don't have particular sensitivity to heat or cold but I can 'feel' that area. It's not painful as such, just that I know it's there. Any ideas?!

The dentist I saw said it was probably because of the deep filling that I can feel it.
 
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It might be a good idea to check your occlusion on that tooth as well. Sometimes if you bite on a tooth that is a little too " high ", it might cause you to " feel " that specific area.
Ask your dentist to adjust any high spots and then feel if it makes a difference.
 
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It might be a good idea to check your occlusion on that tooth as well. Sometimes if you bite on a tooth that is a little too " high ", it might cause you to " feel " that specific area.
Ask your dentist to adjust any high spots and then feel if it makes a difference.

Ok, will do.
Thank you very much for your advice.
 

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