Filling and root canal


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Hi, I'm new here. I always get worried about going to the dentist.
I had a deep filling in June last year. The dentist wasn't sure about filling or root canal but went for filling.

My tooth doesn't hurt when I bite or put pressure on it, doesn't hurt when I tap on it, and isn't discoloured etc.

I do get a bit of sensitivity when I have an ice cold drink though. Sensitivity lasts just for a few seconds (usually 2-4 seconds, I'd say). Hot temperatures are fine though.

A new dentist I went to said this could be because the filling being close to the nerve that the very cold could affect it.

Is that right or do those signs I mentioned mean I need a root canal instead?

The x ray looked ok according to the dentist although I don't have them to show.
 
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May 31, 2019
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Good day

The advice the new dentist gave you seems sound. Sometimes a deep filling can lead to some cold sensitivity. If the tooth becomes more painful or sensitive with other stimuli, and you start getting spontaneous pain as well as pain that lasts longer than say 10 seconds, then a root canal treatment might be indicated.
For now my advice would be to watch and wait and to continue to go for your regular check-ups with your dentist, so that the tooth can be monitored.
 
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Tjanks for your response.
Can the situation often change then? As in a filling be ok for it at the beginning but then deteriorate further and need a root canal?

A few of my teeth are a little bit sensitive anyway as I have slight gum recession on some of them.
 
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Good day

It is completely possible that chronic irritation of the nerve of the tooth can later cause irreversible pulpitis in the tooth, leading to a root canal. If there is secondary decay under the filling, this could also lead to a root canal at a later stage. I found that it is best to leave the tooth until it becomes more symptomatic.
As a general rule, I also advise all my patients to use Sensodyne Rapid Relief toothpaste for sensitivity. I don't know if this is available in your country?
A good way to reduce sensitivity, is to brush with the toothpaste like you normally do. Afterwards, take some of the toothpaste on your finger and rub it vigorously all over the teeth that feel sensitive. The golden rule is then to leave it on the tooth, and to not rinse your mouth, for about 5min. Usually if you do this twice a day, you can feel a difference with regards to sensitivity after 3-5 days.
This might help to manage the symptoms on the tooth.

Hope this helps.
 
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Oh thanks that sounds a good idea. I know sensodyne is sold here so I presume the rapid relief type is too. I'll have a look for it and try it out.

Thanks again.
 
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Sorry if this sounds a silly question but which part of the tooth will be most sensitive to do with root canal problems or just the whole tooth in general?

The top of my tooth (ie the biting surface) isn't particularly sensitive, but the side of my tooth is more sensitive, where there's a bit of gum recession.

Would that be more related to the gum recession or possible root canal (if there's more pain in the future)?
 
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Thank you. What I was meaning was, I tried it with some ice a few days ago.

When I bit/chewed the ice there was no sensitivity (even on the tooth with deep filling) but when I put the ice against the sides of the teeth there was some sensitivity on the teeth with more recession.

If it was root canal related would it hurt more when I bit/chewed the ice or not necessarily?
 
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If it was root canal related, the tooth would have symptoms such as spontaneous pain, pain on biting, and lingering pain when exposed to certain stimulus such as heat and cold. It is normal for a tooth to feel sensitive when exposed to ice cubes, but if the pain lingers and you have other symptoms as well, such as the tooth starting to pain randomly, and it keeps you up at night, then it moves more to the realm of root canal problems
 
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