Extraction not so bad?

Discussion in 'Dental Archive' started by privacy.at Anonymous Remailer, Jul 30, 2003.

  1. Hey everyone

    The story going around, especially according to endodontists, is that you can't
    just have a tooth extracted without ruining your whole jaw. They say that if
    you don't get either a bridge or implant that your teeth will shift, or come
    out, and all kinds of other terrible things could happen.

    Well I have a feeling that sometime in the future I will need to have #20 removed.
    In preparation for such an event I was thinking about what I would do. A bridge
    is out of the question since it would ruin 2 perfectly fine teeth and an implant
    would be the absolute last resort.

    I chatted with someone who had a tooth pulled and didn't do anything about
    it. She said she has no problem chewing, her teeth aren't all shifted, and
    she says it's not a big deal. After doing some searches I found this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10986832&dopt=Abstract

    So my question is, what is the true reality of what happens when a tooth is
    extracted and the gap not filled? Also, why wouldn't erupting wisdom teeth
    help close that gap if they can shift?
     
    privacy.at Anonymous Remailer, Jul 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. privacy.at Anonymous Remailer

    Dr Steve Guest

    So my question is, what is the true reality of what happens when a tooth
    is
    - - - - - - - -

    Usually the tooth behind the gap tipps forward and the tooth in front of the
    gap rotates and tips *slightly* back. Once in a great while, the teeth do
    not move. It may take one year to see the movement, or it could take ten
    years. Once the teeth begin to tip, they will *often* tip faster. And,
    wisdom teeth cannot push hard enough to move that much tooth structure that
    far away.



    --
    ~+--~+--~+--~+--~+--
    Stephen Mancuso, D.D.S.
    Troy, Michigan, USA

    {remove first 3 dots for email}
    .....................................................

    This posting is intended for informational or conversational purposes only.
    Always seek the opinion of a licensed dental professional before acting on
    the advice or opinion expressed here. Only a dentist who has examined you
    in person can diagnose your problems and make decisions which will affect
    your health.
    .......................
    Please ignore j..d...
    ~~~~``````````#####----
     
    Dr Steve, Jul 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. Why not ROOT CANAL?



    On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 04:14:24 +0200 (CEST), "privacy.at Anonymous
    --
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.
    Philadelphia PA

    www.phillyducks.com
    We’re Just A Duck Call Away!


    STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies ~
    meaning no one IN PENNSYLVANIA
    has seen the tooth or teeth in
    question so take this advice in
    proper context ~ its the internet!

    We is guessin'!
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Jul 30, 2003
    #3
  4. May or may not shift ,,, ,no one can tell what the future brings!



    On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 04:14:24 +0200 (CEST), "privacy.at Anonymous
    --
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.
    Philadelphia PA

    www.phillyducks.com
    We’re Just A Duck Call Away!


    STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies ~
    meaning no one IN PENNSYLVANIA
    has seen the tooth or teeth in
    question so take this advice in
    proper context ~ its the internet!

    We is guessin'!
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Jul 30, 2003
    #4
  5. privacy.at Anonymous Remailer

    fmn Guest

    You are correct, your life will not end if you do without a replacement.
    Teeth usually shift, however if you are a heavy clencher, often they will
    stay right in place. So about 1/3 of the time based on your face and jaw
    shape, you will be just fine except for the inconvenience of chunks of foot
    getting caught there and hurting your gums if it is a tortilla chip or some
    other hard item
    The mouth is designed to work with the teeth supporting each other in a
    dynamic active system. One tooth missing has results (see STeves comments)
    that are predictable and over many years, can eventually cause hard to fix
    problems.
    I would suggest reconsidering the implant, though. One of my best
    treatments is immediate placement of an implant after extracting the tooth.
    It heals quite nicely and is a great service. It is expensive, but a very
    good treatment.
    fmn dds
    message news:...
     
    fmn, Jul 30, 2003
    #5
  6. privacy.at Anonymous Remailer

    fmn Guest

    Although it is generally sound advice, why do you say a "qualified implant
    specialist"? Sounds like you are buying into the marketing hype by the oral
    surgeons and periodontists who don't want us conscientious general dentists
    to do it. I have been doing implants quite successfully in my office for
    about 3 years (after 20 years in practice) and they are not that difficult
    to do.
    fmn dds
     
    fmn, Jul 30, 2003
    #6
  7. The word "qualified" probably should not have been used. "Experienced" would
    have been a better choice. I know my "general" dentist would not do one and
    won't even do root canals since he's had problems with them in the past and has
    too much regular dental work to do anyway. He recommended against my implant,
    admitting that he was in minority of opinion on the subject. He feels that all
    the data on them is not yet in and who knows what will be uncovered down the
    road. Maybe its like the botched laser surgeries, who knows.

    But, I feel, after talking to an "experienced" implant dentist, that it is okay
    for me to have the implant. BTW, this experienced dentist said he wouldn't
    implant at time of extraction because the implant would be too wobbly and might
    not set properly. He's a Professor in the dental school. Comments?

    George

    fmn wrote:
    Dr. Steve is correct in his comments, and if you look around the web you can
    find examples and pictures of tooth shift. Two most common fixes are, as you
    said, are bridge and implant. I think if you re-study the implant, and can
    afford it, that is the best way to go. I would recomend that you see a
    qualified
    implant specialist for a consultation about implants. You might be surprised.
    You can always decide to do nothing after the visit but at least you know your
    options. I had #19 (lower molar) extracted after a botched root canal. Its been
    3
    monthhs now and I can chew fine without the tooth. But I will probably have
    implant put in after the jaw bone heals sufficiently and before things begin to
    shift..>
     
    George Steber, Jul 31, 2003
    #7
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