do you have to floss if you don't eat ?

Discussion in 'Dental Archive' started by Pouta, Oct 14, 2011.

  1. Pouta

    Pouta Guest

    let's say that I avoid chewing/eating on one side of my mouth, do I
    still have to floss that area ?

    my rudimentary knowledge tells me that if food is not present, plaque
    will not form, and thus bacteria won't attack my teeth & gums...

    while on this topic, I'm wondering what the group consensus is --
    regarding "power flossers", e.g. the ones that either use water to
    dislodge plaque, or the ones that use a vibrating rubber tip to do
    same.

    these products all advertise that they are at least as good as (if not
    clearly superior to) string floss, but I wonder if there is any REAL
    clinical evidence of this.

    thank you in advance for your comments !
     
    Pouta, Oct 14, 2011
    #1
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  2. Pouta

    Maier Yancov Guest

    I have not seen any convincing research (without commercial bias) that
    excellent point !

    but, wouldn't that also be true with flossing ?

    i.e. couldn't the string be just as likely to "push downward" a food
    particle ?

    besides irrigating devices, I've also seen "forced air" or "compressed
    air" flossing devices, available commercially -- claiming to be "99%
    better" then string floss...

    clearly, there has got to be a better way than manual/mechanical
    cleaning -- I for one hope that *something* does indeed prove superior
    to that accursed string !!!
     
    Maier Yancov, Oct 17, 2011
    #2
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  3. On 10/16/2011 10:31 PM, Maier Yancov wrote:

    Not if you're flossing correctly. Though the floss is moved up and
    down along the proximal tooth surface, the primary force exerted is
    laterally against the tooth surface. While the floss will help remove
    food between the teeth, the primary goal is to disrupt the plaque
    biofilm, which can then be rinsed out.
    While I have no direct knowledge of these devices, I believe it could
    be quite dangerous, based on reports of air emphysema and air embolism
    from air-turbine dental handpieces. I have no reason to suspect that
    the same would not be true for any other device that can be used to
    forcefully inject air under the gumline. See, for example:

    http://www.maxillofacialsurgeons.org/lectures/Extensive surgical emphysema following.pdf

    Steve




    Don't forget interproximal brushes and devices marketed under the name
    "superfloss". No one device is perfect, but between the different
    devices available, you should be able to find one that works acceptably
    for you.
    Don't know what your objection to floss is, but it is likely that your
    dentist can coach you in proper use--it shouldn't be that arduous.

    Steve
     
    Steven Bornfeld, Oct 17, 2011
    #3
  4. Pouta

    Maier Yancov Guest

    besides irrigating devices, I've also seen "forced air"
    I've used superfloss, it's ok. I'm working my way thru the
    other products :)

    in all of my back teeth, they are so tightly crowded that
    the floss usually shreds before I can get anything done...

    there is the option of re-doing all those fillings, so that
    things aren't so tight, but *that* is not a prospect I'd
    look forward to :-(
     
    Maier Yancov, Oct 18, 2011
    #4
  5. Pouta

    Pouta Guest

    Pouta, Oct 18, 2011
    #5
  6. On 10/17/2011 7:40 PM, Maier Yancov wrote:
    (snip)

    Glide floss is pretty expensive, but quite shred-resistant. Usually
    tight contacts shouldn't routinely shred floss. But if the margins are
    rough or breaking down, that can be a problem with shredding floss. You
    should mention this problem to your dentist next time you get your checkup.

    Steve
     
    Steven Bornfeld, Oct 19, 2011
    #6
  7. I have a couple teeth that shred floss. I save them for
    last.

    --
    Christopher A. Young
    Learn more about Jesus
    www.lds.org
    ..


    message
    Glide floss is pretty expensive, but quite shred-resistant.
    Usually
    tight contacts shouldn't routinely shred floss. But if the
    margins are
    rough or breaking down, that can be a problem with shredding
    floss. You
    should mention this problem to your dentist next time you
    get your checkup.

    Steve
     
    Stormin Mormon, Oct 19, 2011
    #7
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