Bone removal during extraction


Joined
Apr 3, 2021
Messages
1
A large portion of pallet bone was removed during a molar extraction that has left a large divot in my mouth. I was not informed that this may happen prior to extraction, nor did the dentist inform me that he had removed any bone. It wasn't until my 2 week follow up appointment with different dentist that I was told the divot was actually bone that was removed, as I assumed it was just an incision. That follow up dentist said it is "the worst case he's ever seen". I saw a 2nd dentist the following day and he said "it is a very large defect" and suggested I see an oral surgeon. Is this common practice amongst dentist to not inform their patients that bone was removed, or do I have a legal case on my hands?

I also ended up getting a perforation in my sinus membrane that I never was informed could happen. Thankfully that healed on its own.
 

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honestdoc

Verified Dentist
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Jun 14, 2018
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Unfortunately, removing that molar can be very traumatic because it has 3 flared out roots including the prominent palatal root where the defect is. Without removing bone, the roots may never come out. I cannot comment on the lack of communication. I communicate fully with my patients and they can still say I never said anything to them. When a person is in pain, he/she may not fully comprehend details. Since it was a traumatic procedure, that first dentist should have followed you up. The 2nd dentist should never had commented like that because I guarantee you that 2nd dentist did not perform enough of those procedures. By the way, I've seen Oral Surgeons traumatize way more than that.

If a person can wait, I would usually refer molars like that to Oral Surgeons. If they can't, I will inform them I may leave roots in to minimize further trauma. A lot of dentists will disagree with me but I would go back in 1 month (If the person can't go to Oral Surgeon) when the bone would naturally soften around the roots making it less traumatic to remove.
 
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MattKW

Verified Dentist
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Mar 18, 2018
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Extractions don’t always go the way we’d hope, despite careful assessment. If someone reckons they could have done it better, then they’re only saying that with the benefit of hindsight. I’ve done 15000 in my career, and I still get the occasional one that is unexpectedly difficult. Sometimes the opposite happens where I feel it will be quite difficult, but then both the patient and I are pleasantly surprised by an easy extraction.
 

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