bleeding gums...

Discussion in 'Dental Archive' started by MJ, Jul 9, 2003.

  1. MJ

    MJ Guest

    Hi people,

    Can anyone who knows about such things possibly let me know if there's
    another approach that I can take to stop my gums bleeding whenever I brush
    my teeth? I've never had the problem before (I'm 40), and can't seem to get
    rid of it even with mouthwashes (incl. Corsodyl, which has now made some of
    my teeth go black...), lots of vit C (1 or 2 grams twice a day),
    regular brushing with an electric toothbrush, and use of a spray irrigator
    morning and evening. What on earth shall I try next? It's getting to be a
    bit of a worry...

    Thanks,

    MJ
     
    MJ, Jul 9, 2003
    #1
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  2. MJ

    MJ Guest

    Well, that depends on what's going to happen. I'm not interested in any
    'visit' which produces the reaction: "Ah, I see you have bleeding gums. Keep
    your mouth cleaner. That'll be £45 please".

    MJ
     
    MJ, Jul 9, 2003
    #2
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  3. Great! See what's happening? We have convinced everyone to start
    sounding like the Brits!~

    Delicious desert: £ cake

    Famous author: Ezra £

    etc.
    --
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.
    Philadelphia PA

    www.phillyducks.com
    We’re Just A Duck Call Away!


    STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies ~
    meaning no one IN PENNSYLVANIA
    has seen the tooth or teeth in
    question so take this advice in
    proper context ~ its the internet!

    We is guessin'!
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Jul 9, 2003
    #3
  4. I prefer Ucandrill instead of Lemmeedrill.

    On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 19:51:49 +0200, "Krzysztof Polanowski"
    --
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.
    Philadelphia PA

    www.phillyducks.com
    We’re Just A Duck Call Away!


    STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies ~
    meaning no one IN PENNSYLVANIA
    has seen the tooth or teeth in
    question so take this advice in
    proper context ~ its the internet!

    We is guessin'!
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Jul 9, 2003
    #4
  5. MJ

    rppj Guest

    MJ - to demonstrate what happens in your mouth I use an analogy of what
    happens when you work with your hands in the garden. When gardening mud and
    debris gets pushed underneath your fingernails, when you are finished you go
    inside and wash your hands and generally most of the debris washes away,
    however, a black line of "stuff" remains to which you use a nailfile, or the
    tip of the scissors to clean it away. Right - if you don't you know that
    you risk infection? Now, back to your mouth, every time you eat food mixed
    with saliva and a slurry produced, some of this nutrient rich slurry works
    its way underneath your gums around each tooth - a couple of times a day you
    clean your teeth with a toothbrush and the most effective brusher can only
    clean 1-2mm under the gums - most of us don't manage to do this. Therefore
    food debris collects in this pocket of gum and gets bathed by the fluids in
    the mouth and hardened by the minerals contained in these fluids (saliva
    etc.) Over time this debris collects and adheres to the tooth as a stoney
    substance called calculus or tartar. Calculus contains bacteria that are
    feeding on the food debris and the toxins from these bacteria leach into the
    gum tissue causing infection.

    The debris that collects under the gums needs to be cleaned out regularly
    and while brushing and flossing and irrigating is good the dental equivalent
    to the nailfile or tip of the scissors used to clean your fingernails is the
    dental curette or scaler weilded by a professional (dentist or dental
    hygienist). Every dental professional goes to have their teeth cleaned
    professionally simply because it isn't possible to do a good job on your
    own.

    There are well documented links between gum diseases and other systemic
    conditions and logic tells you that anything that is ingested by the body
    passes through the mouth and over the gums and if this area is overloaded
    with infection then the rest of the body will be put at risk. A dental
    cleaning is a small price to pay for continued good health.

    Penny, RDH in Ontario
     
    rppj, Jul 10, 2003
    #5
  6. Sorry ......... this was American as First Language humor ......

    I wrote: Ucandrill and Lemmeedrill ?


    Ucandrill ...... means "You Can Drill ...[the tooth]."

    Lemmeedrill .... means "Let Me Drill ... [the tooth]"

    ..... as in "he has excellent insurance and does not mind paying extra
    for some personalized service ......"


    Joel

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 10:27:32 +0200, "Krzysztof Polanowski"
    --
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.
    Philadelphia PA

    www.phillyducks.com
    We’re Just A Duck Call Away!


    STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies ~
    meaning no one IN PENNSYLVANIA
    has seen the tooth or teeth in
    question so take this advice in
    proper context ~ its the internet!

    We is guessin'!
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Jul 10, 2003
    #6
  7. : Hi people,

    : Can anyone who knows about such things possibly let me know if there's
    : another approach that I can take to stop my gums bleeding whenever I brush
    : my teeth? I've never had the problem before (I'm 40), and can't seem to get
    : rid of it even with mouthwashes (incl. Corsodyl, which has now made some of
    : my teeth go black...), lots of vit C (1 or 2 grams twice a day),
    : regular brushing with an electric toothbrush, and use of a spray irrigator
    : morning and evening. What on earth shall I try next? It's getting to be a
    : bit of a worry...

    Do you floss? Or not?


    Emma
     
    Emma Chase VanCott, Jul 10, 2003
    #7
  8. MJ

    MJ Guest

    Not. I use a spray irrigator instead. I take it that this is an acceptable
    alternative... (?)

    MJ.
     
    MJ, Jul 12, 2003
    #8
  9. MJ

    MJ Guest

    *Why* not?

    MJ
     
    MJ, Jul 13, 2003
    #9
  10. MJ

    rppj Guest

    Irrigators do a number of things:
    1. They blast away loose debris - plaque in a sticky matrix will only be
    removed by physical contact with brush or floss - inderdental brushes are
    good but floss is the only thing that passes through the contact area.
    2. They pulsate on the gums and "massage" the tissues thus encouraging
    blood flow with antibodies to fight infection from within the tissue and the
    ability to build healthy new tissues.
    3. As the force of the water passes above the sulcus (pocket) it sets up
    a vacuum type situation in the pocket (venturi effect) and sucks out any
    loose debris under the gums.
    4, They are a good substitute in situations where you know the patient
    can't or won't use floss (kids wearing braces for instance)

    However, as I said previously, no matter how good your homecare nothing
    substitutes for regular professional cleanings. Excellent homecare means
    that your gums are reasonably healthy and a regular dental hygiene cleaning
    isn't painful but some "stuff" just has to be scraped off the tooth
    regularly to ensure continued health of the gums and tooth structure.

    Hey WB how often do you get your teeth cleaned? Personally I'm in every
    three months or so but then I'm no spring chicken and I have tons of
    fillings and the odd crown to protect ( I was raised in the pre fluoride
    era!) Also I didn't "see the light" and become a hygienist until I was over
    40 so I have made all the mistakes that I see my patients making!

    Penny, RDH in Ontario
     
    rppj, Jul 13, 2003
    #10
  11. Would that be the origin of the expression, "getting hosed by the
    dental hygienist?"



    On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 13:17:48 GMT, Steven Fawks
    --
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.
    Philadelphia PA

    www.phillyducks.com
    We’re Just A Duck Call Away!


    STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies ~
    meaning no one IN PENNSYLVANIA
    has seen the tooth or teeth in
    question so take this advice in
    proper context ~ its the internet!

    We is guessin'!
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Jul 14, 2003
    #11
  12. MJ

    MJ Guest

    Okay; I'm convinced.

    Never been near tobacco *at all*! *Filthy* habit!!

    MJ
     
    MJ, Jul 15, 2003
    #12
  13. Some people take their teeth through one of those drive throughs, but
    watch out for the hot Carnauba wax ........



    --
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.
    Philadelphia PA

    www.phillyducks.com
    We’re Just A Duck Call Away!


    STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies ~
    meaning no one IN PENNSYLVANIA
    has seen the tooth or teeth in
    question so take this advice in
    proper context ~ its the internet!

    We is guessin'!
     
    Joel M. Eichen D.D.S., Jul 15, 2003
    #13
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