bad teeth pls look at pic

Discussion in 'Dental Archive' started by news.planet.nl, Jan 9, 2006.

  1. Dear Dentists,

    Due to smoking, stress, not cleaning between teeth. My once nice looking
    teeth have gone quite bad.

    I have quite smoking and I am trying to avoid foods that cause plaque.

    But they're still very sensitive all the time, still have some gingivitis.
    and i am really concerned with their look.

    I am not interested in destructive treatments like crowns/veneeers. What I
    am looking for is the best possible way to get my teeth/gums healthier and
    looking better. Money is not an issue.

    Why can I have so much plaque/staining when i am so obsessively cleaning my
    teeth? (I do drink tea all day)

    Please have a look at the pictures and give me your advise.
    Please no unfriendly reply's.

    http://home.planet.nl/~holl0645/mygrossteeth.gif
     
    news.planet.nl, Jan 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. news.planet.nl

    letsconnect Guest

    news.planet.nl wrote:
    You're in luck... the worst offenders are on strike (ahem, boycott) at
    the moment... unfortunately, most of the regular dentists have joined
    in. As a non-dentist, the first question I'd ask is, have you had a
    professional cleaning yet?
     
    letsconnect, Jan 9, 2006
    #2
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  3. You need a cleaning first. That alone would probably get 80% of your
    staining removed.
     
    The Real Paul, Jan 10, 2006
    #3
  4. news.planet.nl

    Newbie Guest


    Looks like a professional cleaning is in order.
     
    Newbie, Jan 10, 2006
    #4
  5. Start with a deep cleaning, then if you can maintain the health you can
    consider other options to make them look bettter.
    Flossing is important if you want to keep your teeth.
     
    Alexander Vasserman DDS, Jan 13, 2006
    #5
  6. news.planet.nl

    Sue Guest

    news.planet.nl wrote:
    You should be congratulated for quitting smoking, starting to eat
    healthfully and inquiring about your oral health. Your desire to avoid
    destructive "cosmetic" treatments is an intelligent attitude as well
    (IMHO).

    Seek professional care and continue good homecare. I think you are
    starting down a good road now. Keep up the good work!!

    Best,
    Sue (patient)

    PS Check out the health benefits of certain teas (particularly green &
    white teas). Some evidence has been put forth claiming these may
    actually promote gum health

    Subject: "u know how Coke is bad for ur teeth cuz of the sugar... does
    this mean diet coke is ok" (thread started on Jan. 9)

    Letsconnect posts:
    Anyways - tea has been found to be beneficial for dental health...
    (apart from potential staining, which is more of a cosmetic issue).

    Stephen D posts:
    Some of the most healthy teas don't have a whole lot of caffeine in
    them, at least not as much as colas or coffee. White tea, for example,
    has more antioxidants than other types of tea, even more than green
    tea, and it only has about 15-20mg of caffeine per cup. (White tea
    isn't very common though, but sometimes you'll see it around.) Green
    tea has about the same amount of caffeine as white tea, averaging
    slightly higher. Next highest is oolong
    tea, and black tea is the highest with about half as much caffeine as
    an average cup of coffee.

    Darker teas, such as black teas, also have certain chemicals in them (I
    think they are called tannins...) and one recent study was done to see
    if drinking beverages with high amounts of tannins (black tea) is
    effective in reducing the amount of... *gasp* mercury in the human
    body. (Two groups ate a lot of fish with a known amount of mercury in
    it, and the control group didn't drink tea but the experimental group
    did.) At the time that I heard
    about this study, they were still compiling the data, so I don't know
    how the study turned out. Sorry! I'll let you know if I run across
    anything...I'm a big fan of tea, and I'm a dental student, so if you
    have any more information about tea's benefits to dental health, please
    let me know of any specific references!

    --Stephen Daniels
     
    Sue, Jan 13, 2006
    #6
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