9 Yr old front tooth broken


Eva

Joined
Apr 2, 2015
Messages
1
My 9 year old broke her top front permanent tooth, central incisor. We found the tooth and the dentist managed to adhere the original back on. About 75% of the tooth fell off. It has fallen out twice now in 10 months. She's very careful how she eats, never using her front teeth. There's just not a lot to work with to maintain the strength. She's too young for crowns or veneers. Are there any alternatives at this age? Thank you!
 
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Joined
Apr 3, 2015
Messages
2
You could ask the dentist to cement the broken part again and if it fell again shortly you could ask for a white filling or composite .the other question have the tooth nerve been exposed due to the trauma?
 

drmins

Verified Dentist
Joined
Sep 26, 2014
Messages
137
About 75% of the tooth fell off.

As you have stated that about 75% of the tooth is saparated,it is involving the pulp tissues or nerves.Guess that endodontic treatment was perfomed before re-cementing the fragments.However,it is prone for fracture again.

Composite buildups will be a better option for the time being. After few years,permanent crowns can be given.
Pls upload a pic and x-ray image to confirm,if any post and core is needed.

Keep smiling
dr.mins
 
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Joined
Oct 31, 2014
Messages
7
My 9 year old broke her top front permanent tooth, central incisor. We found the tooth and the dentist managed to adhere the original back on. About 75% of the tooth fell off. It has fallen out twice now in 10 months. She's very careful how she eats, never using her front teeth. There's just not a lot to work with to maintain the strength. She's too young for crowns or veneers. Are there any alternatives at this age? Thank you!

Unfortunately, there aren't many options available for chipped teeth. Your dentist most likely used a composite resin to adhere the chipped tooth to where it was removed.

Crowns and veneers are the first and most effective choice for pediatric chipped teeth. If you are worried about the procedure, I would speak to a pediatric dentist you can trust. There are a variety of sedation methods that aren't as risky as full anasthesia.
 

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