Wisdom tooth extraction report - the extraction experience

Discussion in 'Dental Archive' started by Lawrence Troxler, May 22, 2004.

  1. Hi everyone. I know that before I went for my lower wisdom tooth
    extraction, I scoured this newsgroup for experiences, so I thought now
    that I had this done, I'd post my own for the benefit of others who are
    wondering what it is like.

    I'm 41 years old, and had a partially gum-impacted lower right wisdom
    tooth, which was therefore difficult to clean. I had started to get vague,
    mild, hard to localize achiness in the area beginning a few months ago,
    and about six weeks ago had an episode of gum imflamation in the area. So
    I decided it was time for it to go.

    Monday, five days ago, I had the extraction done. Not having any dental
    surgery done before this, I was very squeamish about the idea, and
    intially had been considering getting IV sedation. As it turns out, I
    braced myself and went only with Nitrous Oxide and of course local
    anesthetic. I was very nervous even after breathing the gas, before the
    surgeon started. But it wasn't nearly as traumatic as I thought. First, he
    had me rest the opposite side of my mouth on some kind of brace which kept
    my mouth open. For this I was very greatfull, beacuse during dental
    cleanings, I always have a hard time keeping my mouth open wide enough.
    But with this spacer thing, it was no effort at all. The next good thing
    was that he swabbed the area with an numbing gel, before doing the
    lydocaine injections. This really worked, and I only felt pressure from
    the needles afterwords, and no pain.

    Next was a "test" to see if I was numb, which now that I think of it, was
    probably the actual incision to cut away the gum from the tooth. At the
    time I was not queasy at all. It's not just that the lydocaine prevents
    pain, it really prevents you from perceiving anything at all of what's
    going on in your mouth. So I didn't even realize I was getting cut (if
    even I was) until afterwards.

    Then after that, there was some kind of drilling noise, and some tugging
    back and forth, and in less then five minutes the tooth was out and the
    surgeon was asking me to bite down on gauze.

    So all in all, I have to say that the extraction was much less
    disconcerting than I had expected. Of course everyone's case is different,
    and I'm probably lucky that the tooth came out so easily. But in my case,
    my imagination of what the experience would be like was far worse than the
    actualy reality, which was over before I knew it. In fact, I could almost
    say (but not quite) that it was less unpleasant than sitting through a
    prolonged dental cleaning, enduring the dreaded picking and scraping.

    Since it was so easy, I'm very happy that I didn't opt for IV sedation for
    this. In retrospect, it would have been extreme overkill for something
    that took all of about five minutes. I am happy, however, that I asked
    for the Nitrous - I believe that it helped a bit.

    Larry Troxler
    Lawrence Troxler, May 22, 2004
    #1
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  2. Lawrence Troxler

    feyd Guest

    In article <8czrc.2354$>,
    says...
    Yawn. Let us know when you have a REAL "extraction experience" to
    share... Like when the tooth is still way up under the bone and turned
    sideways, and the doctor has to spend half an hour jackhammering it out
    of there.
    feyd, May 22, 2004
    #2
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  3. Jackhammering? Do you really think we believe you bring in a
    jackhammer to remove teeth?


    JOEL
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S., May 22, 2004
    #3
  4. On 22 May 2004 13:27:54 GMT, ojunk (Orthodmd) wrote:
    REPLY

    We agree. Next time please specify if the tooth was removed by
    dentist, oral surgeon, or dental hygienist.

    JOEL
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S., May 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Orthodmd <> wrote:
    : it is important to specify in postings of this nature whether you were
    treated
    : by a dentist or an oral surgeon. I have not watched thousands of wisdom teeth
    : be extracted but those that I have seen, were all done by an OS and it is
    : almost inconceivable that they would "jackhammer" a tooth for half and hour.


    Sorry. Although this may not have been directed specifically at me, for
    the record, it was an oral surgeon that did my extraction (I'm the
    original poster, who had a soft-tissue impaction, not the one with the
    bone impaction).

    Larry Troxler
    Lawrence Troxler, May 22, 2004
    #5
  6. feyd <> wrote:
    : > Then after that, there was some kind of drilling noise, and some tugging
    : > back and forth, and in less then five minutes the tooth was out and the
    : > surgeon was asking me to bite down on gauze.

    : Yawn. Let us know when you have a REAL "extraction experience" to
    : share... Like when the tooth is still way up under the bone and turned
    : sideways, and the doctor has to spend half an hour jackhammering it out
    : of there.

    Sorry. I was only posting my experience. I don't think I implied (did I?)
    that everyone would have it so easy.

    Larry
    Lawrence Troxler, May 22, 2004
    #6
  7. Lawrence Troxler

    Vaughn Guest

    "feyd" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    How about a hammer and chisel? Had it happen to me in boot camp. None of
    that wimpy IV or gas stuff either. It was that dentist's first day on the job
    (or perhaps he was an old hand and just giving me the "boot" treatment).

    As the dentists here will suspect, the experience was not as bad as it
    sounds. The purpose of the chisel was to section the tooth because of divergent
    roots after first deeply notching it with (I suppose) a burr or disk.

    Vaughn
    Vaughn, May 22, 2004
    #7
  8. Yup, I have one of those stainless steel chisels and hammers .......
    scary looking but sometimes effective.

    JOEL



    On Sat, 22 May 2004 22:53:29 GMT, "Vaughn"
    <> wrote:
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S., May 23, 2004
    #8
  9. Vaughn <> wrote:

    : "feyd" <> wrote in message
    : news:...
    : > In article <8czrc.2354$>,
    : >
    : > Yawn. Let us know when you have a REAL "extraction experience"

    : How about a hammer and chisel? Had it happen to me in boot camp. None of
    : that wimpy IV or gas stuff either. It was that dentist's first day on the job
    : (or perhaps he was an old hand and just giving me the "boot" treatment).

    : As the dentists here will suspect, the experience was not as bad as it
    : sounds. The purpose of the chisel was to section the tooth because of divergent
    : roots after first deeply notching it with (I suppose) a burr or disk.

    : Vaughn

    And let's not forget, it's not the extraction experience, but the pain
    afterwards, that really matters. It's the sixth day now for me and I still
    have a nagging throbbing. It's not getting better yet - if any thing it's
    still getting worse!

    Larry Troxler
    Lawrence Troxler, May 23, 2004
    #9
  10. Lawrence Troxler

    Dr. Steve Guest


    Sounds like a dry-socket,,,,,, get back to the surgeon who took the tooth
    out and have the socket packed with medicated paste. It will feel better
    minutes later.
    Dr. Steve, May 23, 2004
    #10
  11. Dr. Steve <> wrote:

    : > And let's not forget, it's not the extraction experience, but the pain
    : > afterwards, that really matters. It's the sixth day now for me and I still
    : > have a nagging throbbing. It's not getting better yet - if any thing it's
    : > still getting worse!
    : >
    : > Larry Troxler


    : Sounds like a dry-socket,,,,,, get back to the surgeon who took the tooth
    : out and have the socket packed with medicated paste. It will feel better
    : minutes later.

    Yeah, I think I'll call their office Monday - it seems that my reaction to
    this pain is just to fall asleep - and this is without even taking the
    Vidodin, so it's not that it's just an effect of the med. It's a bit
    disconcerting to wake up, see 7:00 on the clock, and then have to figure out
    whether it's AM or PM! I doubt whether I've been awake more then a
    few hours this weekend so far. Maybe I need to seek out some good
    espresso.

    I read a bit about dry socket on this newsgroup, but it always referred to
    severe pain, which I don't have. I only have a moderate, comes and goes,
    kind of pain. I can still talk with it it and walk around, and even
    drive if I'm carefull, etc, so it's
    definitely not severe, just anoying to the point I wish it would go away!

    But although the pain itself isn't bad, it seems the related effects (like
    sleeping all the time) are, so I'll call these guys on Monday. So it's
    possible, I guess, to have a very mild case of dry socket?. Whatever it
    is, I just hope it's related to this extraction, and not a case of "oh
    well, it's actually your 2nd molar that's causing the pain"!

    Larry

    p
    Lawrence Troxler, May 23, 2004
    #11
  12. Dr. Steve <> wrote:

    : > And let's not forget, it's not the extraction experience, but the pain
    : > afterwards, that really matters. It's the sixth day now for me and I still
    : > have a nagging throbbing. It's not getting better yet - if any thing it's
    : > still getting worse!
    : >
    : > Larry Troxler


    : Sounds like a dry-socket,,,,,, get back to the surgeon who took the tooth
    : out and have the socket packed with medicated paste. It will feel better
    : minutes later.

    Uh-oh, I talked to the surgeon, and he said that it's not typical for a
    wisdom tooth extraction to cause sensitivity to cold. He said on the phone
    (of curse he'll have to see me to diagnose anything) that possibly the
    surgury uncovered a cavity on the adjacent molar.

    Mind you, none of this makes any sense to me, since I was at the dentist
    for a checkup and cleaning just a month ago, and the surgeoen also saw me
    to treat some gum imflmation a couple weeks before the extraction. And
    panoramic x-rays were done.

    I certainly hope you're right and that it is in fact a mild case of dry
    socket - it would really be bad if this is extraction was done all for
    nothing!

    Larry
    Lawrence Troxler, May 24, 2004
    #12
  13. Lawrence Troxler

    Dave King Guest

    On Sat, 22 May 2004 22:53:29 GMT, "Vaughn"
    <> wrote:
    Seeing a mallet & chisel coming at them is a sure way to get their
    cooperation ;)

    I have never used that technique for extractions (hip harvests and
    osteotomies are another story) but I was fortunate to watch one.
    Yikes!
    Dave King, May 24, 2004
    #13
  14. Lawrence Troxler

    W_B Guest

    Dynamite is much quicker.

    On Sat, 22 May 2004 09:04:37 -0400, "Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S." <> wrote:
    --

    W_B

    Take out the G'RBAGE
    W_B, May 24, 2004
    #14
  15. Lawrence Troxler

    W_B Guest

    On Sun, 23 May 2004 12:38:30 GMT, Lawrence Troxler <> wrote:
    Dry socket (alveolar alveolitis)
    --

    W_B

    Take out the G'RBAGE
    W_B, May 24, 2004
    #15
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