Extraction With Infection Present

Discussion in 'Dental Archive' started by reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com, Aug 16, 2004.

  1. Why do dentists insist an infection be gone before extracting a tooth? Is
    this absolutely necessary?

    Thanks,

    Stephen
     
    reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com, Aug 16, 2004
    #1
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  2. reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com wrote:

    Depends. My oral surgeon extracted my wife's tooth in the presence of
    a significant cellulitis. The main thing is that drainage is achieved
    and appropriate antibiotic coverage be given.
    If this is a wisdom tooth though, significant infection can limit your
    opening, making the procedure significantly more difficult. Also,
    active infection can make achieving good anesthesia more difficult.

    Steve

    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
    http://www.dentaltwins.com
    Brooklyn, NY
    718-258-5001
     
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS, Aug 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com

    JWN DDS Guest

    No not all infections need to be treated before extraction. However,
    sometimes the local anesthetic does not work do to the acidic pH of the
    infected tissue. In other words it might hurt like hell when you get the
    tooth pulled because you wouldn't be frozen.

    Is this another of Jan Drew's "I'm opposed to modern medicine" drones?

    jwn dds

    <reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com> wrote in message
    news:tM2Uc.4245$...
     
    JWN DDS, Aug 16, 2004
    #3
  4. On 16-Aug-2004, Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS <>
    wrote:
    It's the 2nd molar and there's a lesion that I've been squeezing pus out of
    on an almost daily basis. So there is drainage.

    BTW According to your sig you're a dentist. Why didn't YOU or your brother
    extract your wife's tooth?
     
    reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com, Aug 16, 2004
    #4
  5. On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 13:40:29 GMT, reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com
    wrote:
    Generally yes, but SPECIFICALLY, no.

    It depends where the infection is located and how extensive it is.
    Local anesthetic depends on the injection of an acidic compound into
    BASIC (pH avove 7.0) human healthy tissues.

    Where there is infection, the tissue itself is acidic (below pH 7.0)

    This means the local anesthetic will not be as effective. A second
    consideration is driving the products of infection deeper into the
    body.

    Joel


     
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S., Aug 16, 2004
    #5
  6. A mitigating factor is when its a lower molar and the possibility
    exists of a profound nerve block injection .....


    Joel

     
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S., Aug 16, 2004
    #6
  7. reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com

    W_B Guest

    On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 13:40:29 GMT, reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com wrote:
    Yes.
    Spread of infection, and ionization of the local anesthetic.
    --

    W_B

    Take out the G'RBAGE
     
    W_B, Aug 16, 2004
    #7
  8. <reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com> skrev i melding
    news:tM2Uc.4245$...
    Intervention in an infected area inevitably leads to bacteria in the blood
    stream - bacteremia. Some patients have a disposition for complications
    of a more severe kind if the dentist doesn't take precautions.

    Elderly and weak often need premedication ( antibiotics) before even
    cleaning the teeth for calculus.

    Kjell
     
    Kjell Erik Tonne, Aug 16, 2004
    #8
  9. reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com wrote:
    A little personal, eh? ;-)
    There was a consideration of an implant, and I did not want to do
    anything to compromise the extraction site for the implant fixture.
    As it turns out, this was a good idea; the surgeon, who I feel is
    sometimes unnecessarily cautious, placed a bone graft at the same time
    as the extraction. Now, extracting the tooth in the presence of acute
    infection did not surprise me, but placing a bone graft in the area did.
    As it turns out, things worked out well (except for having to listen to
    my wife complain about her flipper for the better part of a year ;-))
    and now she has an implant-supported crown.

    Steve
    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
    http://www.dentaltwins.com
    Brooklyn, NY
    718-258-5001
     
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS, Aug 16, 2004
    #9
  10. On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 15:37:45 GMT, W_B <> wrote:
    YUP, well-said.
     
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S., Aug 16, 2004
    #10
  11. On 16-Aug-2004, "Kjell Erik Tonne" <> wrote:
    Well the tooth is finally out! :) I called the dentist an he had an opening
    right away so I went down there and he extracted it no problem. It came out
    nice and easy with the crown intact. Didn't hurt a bit. He did mention he
    was using extra strong anesthetic and was injecting it into the bone. He
    gave me antibiotics too. With digital x-ray included it came out to $250. So
    I'm happy and it's SUCH a relief to have the damn thing out. My next
    question is going to be about implants. Which is better saline or silicone?
     
    reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com, Aug 16, 2004
    #11
  12. reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com wrote:

    Good thing Ilena hasn't been around for a while ;-)
    Glad to hear it went well.

    Steve

    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
    http://www.dentaltwins.com
    Brooklyn, NY
    718-258-5001
     
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS, Aug 16, 2004
    #12
  13. On 16-Aug-2004, Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS <>
    wrote:
    Did you mean my question was too personal or that you're too personally
    involved? The only reason I was asking is that I'm a hypnotherapist and any
    time my wife asks me to work on her it kind of feels a little strange but I
    can't put my finger on just why. The best way I can describe it is it feels
    a little incestuous.
     
    reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com, Aug 16, 2004
    #13
  14. reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com wrote:

    Nah. It was a perfectly reasonable question to ask. Yes, I'm a bit
    uncomfortable working on my wife, but that's mostly because she thinks
    she's a better patient than I think she is. ;-) My daughter is going to
    need orthodontic treatment, probably extractions, and I may refer her
    out for those too. Why should I become the bad guy?
    On the subject of hypnosis, I regret never taking up the kind offer of
    a friend (a psychiatrist) to help me introduce hypnosis into my practice.

    Steve

    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
    http://www.dentaltwins.com
    Brooklyn, NY
    718-258-5001
     
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS, Aug 16, 2004
    #14
  15. On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 19:18:39 GMT, reply_to_me@this_newsgroup.com
    wrote:
    Depends on the cup size .........
     
    Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S., Aug 16, 2004
    #15
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